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    Treeing Walker Coonhound

    Hound-type dogs historically accompanied immigrants to the United States from Europe. Many of these dogs were imports from England, Ireland, and Germany. Hunting was a way of life throughout the south, and these dogs were essential in putting food on tables, putting clothes on backs, and bringing in money for furs, as well as ridding farms, homesteads, and properties of animals that would threaten a family’s livelihood. They hunted an array of quarry, including squirrels, raccoons, foxes, coyotes, deer, and bears.

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    Common Dog Fears (And How to Help Them)

    Fear is a natural, instinctual response that helps every species survive. This reaction to a perceived threat is essential but excessive fear could be just as harmful. Since we can't explain things to dogs, certain noises, actions, or places may trigger a fear response. But how do we help our beloved pets cope or even conquer their fears?

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    Black Mouth Cur Breed Spotlight

    Although there are many hypotheses regarding the origin of the breed, the history of the Black Mouth cur remains slightly murky. Stories of the dogs are well documented throughout the South by families who have kept the dogs for generations.

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    Bloodhound Breed Spotlight

    The Bloodhound breed has existed for many thousands of years. The "blood" aspect of the breed name reportedly comes from the word "blooded"- referring to the hound's status as a purebred. Bloodhounds have been used for tracking both animals and humans for hundreds of years. The bloodhound was one of the earliest dogs to travel to colonial America and was even referenced in letters written by Benjamin Franklin.

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    Rules for Tug-O-War

    Training your dog is an excellent way to deal with long periods of isolation. Many dogs respond well to training with their favorite treats. However, some dogs’ are more motivated by games and toys. Playing tug-o-war can be a fantastic game to use in training. It keeps the dog engaged with the handler. It’s kinetic, so energetic dogs can exercise both mind and body, and it is excellent for use both indoors or outdoors. Playing tug with your dog is a lot of fun. Contrary to popular belief, it does not cause bad behaviors in dogs as long as you and the dog understand a few basic ground rules, as outlined here.

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