Scottish Terrier.jpg
Breed Group Group 6: Terrier Breeds
Sub-group 6-C: Small Terriers
Origin Country Scotland
Weight Males: 19-22 pounds. Females: 18-21 pounds.
Height Males: 10-11 inches. Females: 10-11 inches.
Other Name(s) Aberdeen Terrier
Breed Type Pure
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Scottish Terrier

Breed Group Group 6: Terrier Breeds
Sub-group 6-C: Small Terriers
Origin Country Scotland
Weight Males: 19-22 pounds. Females: 18-21 pounds.
Height Males: 10-11 inches. Females: 10-11 inches.
Other Name(s) Aberdeen Terrier
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

The Scottish Terrier, also known as the Aberdeen Terrier or “Scottie,” shares a history with the Skye Terriers, Cairn Terriers, and West Highland White Terriers. In fact, at one time all of the dogs were lumped under the same blanketed name, “Skye Terrier.” Evidence of these rough-coated Terriers has been recorded in Scotland for centuries. The first recorded account dates back to 1436 CE in a book titled The History of Scotland 1436–1561. These Terriers were originally utilized to spring and eradicate foxes and badgers, as well as pests. It is also reported that King James VI of Scotland exported six Terriers, ancestors of the modern-day Scottish Terrier, to French dignitaries as gifts during the seventeenth century. He was well-known for his love of the Terriers of Scotland, and for putting the little dogs in the world spotlight by sharing them as gifts.

Because these Terriers originated from the Scottish Highlands—which included the Isle of Skye in the Hebrides, the region of Perthshire, Moore of Rannoch, and Aberdeenshire—they were originally referred to as “little Skye Terriers,” and were lumped with all of the other Terrier types from that area of Scotland as “Skye Terriers,” alongside the true Skye Terriers, West Highland White Terriers, and Cairn Terriers. The Scottie and the Cairn were also referred to as “short-haired Skye Terriers,” or just “short-haired Terriers.” However, this did not bode well with the Skye Terrier breeders, and, since the 1920s, the three breeds have been divided into the three modern dogs that we see today. The Aberdeen Terrier, or Scottie, was named after the region where the dogs were most abundant and believed to have originated from.

The early Scottie was originally described as “low in stature, with a strong muscular body, short stout legs, a head large in proportion to the body,” and he was “generally a sandy colour or black” with a “long, matted, and hard coat.” Eventually, the dogs were recognized as belonging to a single breed, and, by 1879, the breed type was established. The first breed standard was written in 1880. The first Scottish Terriers were introduced to the United States at the end of the nineteenth century; however, they did not gain popularity until after World War I. It didn’t take long for the dogs’ newfound popularity to land them the position of the third most popular breed in the U.S. by 1936. Their popularity was boosted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s constant companion, Fala, his favorite Scottish Terrier. However, Fala wasn’t the only Scottish Terrier to live in the White House or a home of nobility. Queen Victoria, Eleanor Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, and Lech Kaczynski all owned
Scottish Terriers.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat dolichocephalic skull-type, rectangular, moderate in size, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The topskull is long, somewhat broad, flat in profile, and slightly arched form the front. Aside from length, the skull lacks any exaggerations and is free from prominent angles or ridges. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle.
Eyes: Somewhat small to moderate in size, set well apart, oval to almond in shape (never round), set well under the eyebrow furnishings. The color is as dark as possible, preferably dark brown to almost black. The eye rims are tightly fitted and darkly pigmented. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are small in size, firmly erect, triangular in shape, pointed at the tips, and set well on top of the skull. Ear tips that point straight upward are most desirable. The ears are never large, overly long, excessively wide at the base, or broken.
Muzzle: The muzzle is long, somewhat broad, and full. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight, or slightly tapered. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak. The end of the muzzle may be angled from a slightly projected nose, or it may be level or blunt. This trait is often concealed by heavy moustache furnishings.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black. The nostrils are well-opened. The nose may project slightly forward beyond the lower jaw.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and strongly muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows, or just below. The forechest is well-developed. There should be sufficient clearance between the ground and the brisket to equal to, at minimum, 1/3rd the height at the withers.
Body: Compact, solid, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set high on the croup. It is straight, thick at the base, tapering toward the tip, and carrot-shaped. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level. It is carried upright, with the tip being approximately level with the topskull. It is never seen tucked. The tail should never be docked. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down.
Movement: The movement is jaunty, effortless, efficient, and energetic. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: While the Scotty is no longer kept for his original purpose of clearing the cairns of unwanted pests or predators, he does retain much of his Terrier heart. Originally developed to work independently of humans, the Scotty is an independent thinker capable of developing his own ideas about the world around him. For this reason, early obedience and socialization is a must. This training will help him to adapt to life as a good-will ambassador for the breed. They are energetic, lively, courageous, and sensitive. Although they often find that asking for forgiveness is better than asking for permission, they are sensitive to scolding and harsh punishment, which can break their trust toward their people. Instead, they can easily be motivated into compliance by offering them activities that capture their interest and attention, and appeal to their high predatory nature, such as playing ball or being allowed to dissect their toys. Scottish Terriers are known to be loyal, gentle, and devoted toward their families and people, but they may exude an heir of indifference toward others. Aggression toward other dogs and predation toward smaller animals is not uncommon in this breed. Therefore, keeping the Scotty as a housemate to small animals and rodents should only be done with great caution and oversight. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 6: Terrier Breeds

Proportions: Somewhat rectangular to rectangular in proportion, with the length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump being somewhat greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body height to length ratio is between 5:4 and 5:3. The length of the topline (from withers to tail base) is equal in length to the head. The body is well-put together, with sturdy substance and medium bone.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat dolichocephalic skull-type, rectangular, moderate in size, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The topskull is long, somewhat broad, flat in profile, and slightly arched form the front. Aside from length, the skull lacks any exaggerations and is free from prominent angles or ridges. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle.
Expression: Alert, piercing, and keen.
Stop: The stop is slight but definite, only sparsely dividing the slightly elevated topskull from the just slightly lower muzzle
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1, with the topskull being equal to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel, or just slightly divergent in tapered muzzles.
Muzzle: The muzzle is long, somewhat broad, and full. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight, or slightly tapered. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak. The end of the muzzle may be angled from a slightly projected nose, or it may be level or blunt. This trait is often concealed by heavy moustache furnishings.
Lips or Flews: Lips are clean and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black. The nostrils are well-opened. The nose may project slightly forward beyond the lower jaw.
Cheeks: The cheeks are smoothly muscled, without appearing chiseled or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, or scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: Somewhat small to moderate in size, set well apart, oval to almond in shape (never round), set well under the eyebrow furnishings. The color is as dark as possible, preferably dark brown to almost black. The eye rims are tightly fitted and darkly pigmented. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are small in size, firmly erect, triangular in shape, pointed at the tips, and set well on top of the skull. Ear tips that point straight upward are most desirable. The ears are never large, overly long, excessively wide at the base, or broken.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, solid, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and strongly muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows, or just below. The forechest is well-developed. There should be sufficient clearance between the ground and the brisket to equal to, at minimum, 1/3rd the height at the withers.
Topline: Level from slightly prominent withers to croup. The back is somewhat short, broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, being flat and level or slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never overly long, swayed, or roached.
Croup: Flat and level with the back or gently sloped.
Underline: Slight tuck up present. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set high on the croup. It is straight, thick at the base, tapering toward the tip, and carrot-shaped. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level. It is carried upright, with the tip being approximately level with the topskull. It is never seen tucked. The tail should never be docked. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades may be equal to or slightly greater than upper and forearms. Dogs that are more rectangular in proportion will have shorter, more dwarfed-legs. Dogs that are off-square will have slightly longer legs free from dwarfism.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The distance from the withers to the brisket may be equal to, or just greater than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, moderate bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of moderate bone, and well-muscled. Dogs that are more rectangular in proportion will have shorter, more dwarfed-legs. Dogs that are off-square; will have slightly longer legs free from dwarfism.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: Intensely harsh, weather-resistant, wiry, and close outer-coat with short, dense, soft undercoat. Scottish Terriers are shown in traditional Scottish Terrier grooming that includes plucking, stripping, or clipping throughout the body, with head, underbelly, and leg furnishings left longer and having a softer texture.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Scottish Terrier breed: the standard color and nonstandard color variety.
Standard coat color variety: Any shade of solid black, steel gray, iron gray, sandy, wheaten, or brindle pattern.
Nonstandard coat color variety: Solid black, grizzle, or gray with tan or brindle points, light cream to solid white, sable, grizzle, and any of the above listed standard or nonstandard colors with white markings (parti- or splashed).

Movement

The movement is jaunty, effortless, efficient, and energetic. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

While the Scotty is no longer kept for his original purpose of clearing the cairns of unwanted pests or predators, he does retain much of his Terrier heart. Originally developed to work independently of humans, the Scotty is an independent thinker capable of developing his own ideas about the world around him. For this reason, early obedience and socialization is a must. This training will help him to adapt to life as a good-will ambassador for the breed. They are energetic, lively, courageous, and sensitive. Although they often find that asking for forgiveness is better than asking for permission, they are sensitive to scolding and harsh punishment, which can break their trust toward their people. Instead, they can easily be motivated into compliance by offering them activities that capture their interest and attention, and appeal to their high predatory nature, such as playing ball or being allowed to dissect their toys. Scottish Terriers are known to be loyal, gentle, and devoted toward their families and people, but they may exude an heir of indifference toward others. Aggression toward other dogs and predation toward smaller animals is not uncommon in this breed. Therefore, keeping the Scotty as a housemate to small animals and rodents should only be done with great caution and oversight. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.