Olde English Bulldogge.jpg
Breed Group Group 4: Bull Breeds
Sub-group 4-A: Bulldogs
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 55-85 pounds. Females: 45-75 pounds.
Height Males: 16-20 inches. Females: 15-19 inches.
Other Name(s) Old English Bulldog, Olde, Olde Bulldogge
Breed Type Pure
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Olde English Bulldogge

Breed Group Group 4: Bull Breeds
Sub-group 4-A: Bulldogs
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 55-85 pounds. Females: 45-75 pounds.
Height Males: 16-20 inches. Females: 15-19 inches.
Other Name(s) Old English Bulldog, Olde, Olde Bulldogge
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

The Olde English Bulldogge’s ancestors can be traced back to the bandogges, butcher’s dogges, and molossoids that were used in the horrific sport of bull-baiting, which was popular in England during the 1700s and 1800s. The dog’s purpose was to grasp and hold the bull’s nose until the bull was rendered helpless. Not only was bull-baiting considered entertaining, but many believed baiting the bull before killing it made the meat tastier and more nutritious. The cruel sport remained widely popular until 1835 when bull baiting was outlawed in England, which nearly resulted in the extinction of the breed. Those who admired the “bulldogs” and wanted to save them from extinction revamped the breed by outcrossing to other dog types, toning down the appearance and tenacity of the breed. It is believed that dogs such as the ancestor of the modern-day Pug were utilized during the process, resulting in the much more docile, yet extreme brachycephalic English Bulldog breed. The extreme transformation of the English Bulldog from agile athlete to rotund companion has taken a toll on the breed, with devastating effects on the dog’s health and quality of life. In fact, the characteristics that make the English Bulldog a breed apart have also unfortunately resulted in an extremely unhealthy phenotype. The extreme brachycephalic skull type, heavy body, and wide chest and forequarters have resulted in breathing difficulties, heat intolerance, and other issues.

In the 1970s, a gentleman by the name of David Leavitt had become dissatisfied with the health issues associated with the English Bulldog. Attracted to the original bulldog’s athleticism and tenacious appearance, he set about to create a dog that resembled the bulldogs of the 18th century. Using a breeding scheme developed by Ohio State University, he quickly reached his goal and named his dogs the Olde English Bulldogge. What Mr. Leavitt had produced was an athletic dog with the characteristic bulldog appearance. It was of good health, capable of breeding and whelping naturally, devoid of breathing difficulties and heat intolerance, and capable of living out a long life of excellent quality.

The original Olde English Bulldogge breed only included dogs that had been carefully selected from Mr. Leavitt’s own breeding stock and, like all purebreds today, the descendants could be traced back to his foundation dogs. Like all good ideas, his attempt to re-create and improve upon the modern-day English Bulldog eventually caught on with others and spread. The Olde English Bulldogge breed grew in popularity and numbers, with many breeders around the country creating their own strains of bulldog crosses and calling them Olde English Bulldogges, although Leavitt’s original lines were not used. Dogs were produced en masse, with no guarantee of breeding or physical ability. In 2006, Mr. Leavitt abandoned the title of Olde English Bulldogge breed. He now recognizes his dogs and lines as the Leavitt Bulldogs, and only descendants of his original foundation stock are considered true Leavitt Bulldogs. However, the Olde English Bulldogge breed continues to grow.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat brachycephalic skull-type, moderately large in size, broad and deep, and always in proportion to the body. When viewed from the front, the head appears square. The topskull is wide between the ears, being equal in width (measured in front of the ears across the top of the skull) as it is long (from stop to occiput). The plane of the topskull is flat to slightly arched, but never prominently so. A prominent furrow begins at the stop and extends up the center of the skull, enhanced by well-developed temporalis muscles on the topskull, to the occiput. The skull should never be narrow or domed. The head should appear clean and free of excess wrinkle and skin. Slight wrinkling on the forehead and cheeks is permissible when the dog is alerted or the mouth is open.
Eyes: The eyes are medium in size, set wide apart, and may be somewhat rounded, open-almond, or lemon-shaped. The preferred color is medium to dark brown, with darkly pigmented membranes and eye rims. The eye rims are well-fitted. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: The ears are small to medium in size and set well-back on the head at the highest and farthest corner of the skull. They may be rose, tulip, drop, or buttoned. They are never erect, semi-erect, overly large, hound-like, or cropped.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep (slightly deeper from chin to plane of the muzzle than the length of the muzzle from the tip of the nose to the stop), full, and square. It is shorter than the topskull, but should never be so short as to give a flat profile appearance. The upper and lower jaws are broad, strong, well-developed and have good bone substance. The lower jaw is somewhat prominent and just slightly turned up. However the lower jaw and teeth should never protrude beyond the break of the lips/flews.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Thick and sufficiently long to allow for proud head carriage. The neck is powerfully muscled with an arch. The neck tapers only slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head, where it remains almost as thick as the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin or throatiness. A very slight dewlap may be present.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Body: Sturdy, powerful, solid, and of good substance, yet agile. The body is never racy, refined, or excessively cobby. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tails should never be docked short, but left natural. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, crank, pump-handled, or forming a slight sabre shape. Kinked tails, ring-tails, crank tails, screw-tails, curled tails, bobbed tails, and docked tails are incorrect for this breed and should be penalized.
Movement: The OEB’s gait is powerful, agile, efficient, energetic, and confident, free from cloddy and heavy movement. Movement is unrestrained and without signs of breathing difficulty. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: Confident, loyal, alert, and watchful. Younger dogs (under a year of age) are often energetic and sociable, or may appear a tad uncertain in novel situations. Well-socialized mature dogs (three years and older) may retain more self-composure and become impartial to friendly or neutral stranger interactions, so a lack of friendly behavior, even aloofness, toward strangers is not to be penalized. If the OEB perceives a threat to himself or his family, he will stand his ground. OEBs may exhibit intraspecific same-sex aggression, so early socialization, along with obedience training, is important for this breed. Adult dogs (one year of age and up) should never exhibit shyness or fearfulness. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 4: Bull Breeds

Proportions: The body is slightly rectangular, with the body length (from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump) being slightly greater than the height (from the withers to the ground). The ideal body-length-to-height ratio is approximately 5:4. The body is well-put together, sturdy, and moderately solid-boned. Males should appear masculine, being more substantial in size and mass, while females should appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type. The body, combining strength and agility, is a return to the bulldogs of old. The Olde English Bulldogge should never appear overly cloddy and cobby, like that of the English Bulldog, nor light and square, like that of the Boxer breed.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat brachycephalic skull-type, moderately large in size, broad and deep, and always in proportion to the body. When viewed from the front, the head appears square. The topskull is wide between the ears, being equal in width (measured in front of the ears across the top of the skull) as it is long (from stop to occiput). The plane of the topskull is flat to slightly arched, but never prominently so. A prominent furrow begins at the stop and extends up the center of the skull, enhanced by well-developed temporalis muscles on the topskull, to the occiput. The skull should never be narrow or domed. The head should appear clean and free of excess wrinkle and skin. Slight wrinkling on the forehead and cheeks is permissible when the dog is alerted or the mouth is open.
Expression: Confident, composed, alert, and watchful.
Stop: The stop is definite, preferably forming a 90-degree angle between the topskull and muzzle.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is between 2:1 and 3:1, with the topskull being longer than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is convergent.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep (slightly deeper from chin to plane of the muzzle than the length of the muzzle from the tip of the nose to the stop), full, and square. It is shorter than the topskull, but should never be so short as to give a flat profile appearance. The upper and lower jaws are broad, strong, well-developed and have good bone substance. The lower jaw is somewhat prominent and just slightly turned up. However the lower jaw and teeth should never protrude beyond the break of the lips/flews.
Lips or Flews: Lips are relatively clean and fit well over the teeth and jaws. The lips are thick, broad, and only semi-pendulous, being just long enough to adequately and cleanly cover the teeth and jaws, and enhance the muzzle’s squared appearance. They should never appear loose or overly pendulous.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are well-muscled and well-developed. However, they should not appear chiseled or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, reverse-scissor, or slightly undershot with less than ¼ inch of space between upper and lower incisors being permissible. Contact preferred between the top and bottom incisors. The lower jaw is slightly curved, allowing for the chin to have a prominent, yet not protrusive, position on the muzzle. All teeth should be well-concealed when the dog’s mouth is closed. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: The eyes are medium in size, set wide apart, and may be somewhat rounded, open-almond, or lemon-shaped. The preferred color is medium to dark brown, with darkly pigmented membranes and eye rims. The eye rims are well-fitted. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: The ears are small to medium in size and set well-back on the head at the highest and farthest corner of the skull. They may be rose, tulip, drop, or buttoned. They are never erect, semi-erect, overly large, hound-like, or cropped.

Body and Tail

General Description: Sturdy, powerful, solid, and of good substance, yet agile. The body is never racy, refined, or excessively cobby. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Thick and sufficiently long to allow for proud head carriage. The neck is powerfully muscled with an arch. The neck tapers only slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head, where it remains almost as thick as the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin or throatiness. A very slight dewlap may be present.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Topline: Straight and level from withers to croup (preferred), however, a “wheel” back, with a minimal (almost imperceptible) dip directly behind the withers and a gentle arch at the loin is not to be penalized. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut and may be flat and level or slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Flat and level with the back, or gently sloped.
Underline: Slight tuck-up present, or the underline may run parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tails should never be docked short, but left natural. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, crank, pump-handled, or forming a slight sabre shape. Kinked tails, ring-tails, crank tails, screw-tails, curled tails, bobbed tails, and docked tails are incorrect for this breed and should be penalized.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.

NOTE: The shoulders and elbows should never be so broad that they that they appear disproportionate to the hindquarters. Excessively broad shoulders coupled with narrow hindquarters places strain on the forequarters and shifts the dog’s center of gravity, with more weight and strain being placed on the forequarters. This, in turn, detracts from balance, efficient movement, agility, stamina and endurance. Broad shoulders coupled with narrow hindquarters also hinder the dog’s ability to whelp naturally and should be disqualified.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The distance from the withers to the brisket may be equal to, or just greater than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, of moderately solid bone, and parallel to one another. A very slight outward orientation of the feet is permissible.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of moderately solid bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.

NOTE: Excessively narrow hindquarters in comparison to forequarters strains the forequarters and shifts the dog’s center of gravity, with more weight and strain being placed on the forequarters. This, in turn, detracts from balance, efficient movement, agility, stamina and endurance. Narrow hindquarters also result in a narrow pelvis, coupled with broad shoulders hinders the breed’s ability to whelp naturally and should be disqualified.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: Short, close, lustrous, and moderately dense. Never with fringing, feathering, wave, or curl.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Olde English Bulldogge breed: the standard color and nonstandard color variety.
Standard coat color variety: Solid colors and patterns of fawn (tan with black melanistic mask), tan, cream, red, mahogany, brindle (any brindle color with black-base coat, indicated by black nose and eye rims). Fawn, red, mahogany, tan, cream, black, blue, grey, brindle (black-based), all with varying degrees of white markings (piebalds), or mostly white with the above listed color/pattern markings.
Nonstandard coat color variety: Any color not listed above, including solid colors of black, blue, and liver-based color patterns (including Isabella and silver). Liver or blue based fawn (tan with liver or blue-based masks, including Isabella and silver.) Merle of any color, or any eumelanin (black, liver, blue, grey, Isabella, or silver) color with tan or brindle points. Large patches or amounts of white indicating homogenous merle genotype/phenotype is undesirable.

Movement

The OEB’s gait is powerful, agile, efficient, energetic, and confident, free from cloddy and heavy movement. Movement is unrestrained and without signs of breathing difficulty. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

Confident, loyal, alert, and watchful. Younger dogs (under a year of age) are often energetic and sociable, or may appear a tad uncertain in novel situations. Well-socialized mature dogs (three years and older) may retain more self-composure and become impartial to friendly or neutral stranger interactions, so a lack of friendly behavior, even aloofness, toward strangers is not to be penalized. If the OEB perceives a threat to himself or his family, he will stand his ground. OEBs may exhibit intraspecific same-sex aggression, so early socialization, along with obedience training, is important for this breed. Adult dogs (one year of age and up) should never exhibit shyness or fearfulness. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.