North American Indian Dog.jpg
Breed Group Group 1: Primitive, Pariah, and Feral Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 75-130 pounds. Females: 65-105 pounds.
Height Males: 27-34 inches. Females: 23-30 inches.
Other Name(s) American Indian Dog, NorthAID
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD
meet the...

North American Indian Dog

Breed Group Group 1: Primitive, Pariah, and Feral Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 75-130 pounds. Females: 65-105 pounds.
Height Males: 27-34 inches. Females: 23-30 inches.
Other Name(s) American Indian Dog, NorthAID
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

Contrary to its appearance, the North American Indian Dog (also called the NorthAID) is not a wolf, nor is it a wolf-dog hybrid. Instead, it is a rare dog landrace that was developed in 1986 by breeder Mark Klemperer. The NorthAID was developed by crossing breeds, including Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies, with root wolf stock. Following many generations of artificial selection for temperament, trainability, and appearance, the end result was a resilient, adaptable, highly trainable, and even-tempered dog that, for all intents and purposes, phenotypically appears more wolf-like than any other recognized dog breed.

Please note: The North American Indian Dog breed is not eligible for CKC's Picture and Witness (PAW) Program.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat long, mesaticephalic skull type, lupoid, shaped like an elongated wedge, moderate in size, and fairly large in proportion to the rest of the body when compared to other dog breeds. The topskull is fairly broad, being sufficient in breadth to give the head width, and to prevent a narrow or dolichocephalic appearance. The topskull may be flat in profile and between the ears, with smooth, gently sloped, yet powerful temporalis muscles. The rear portion of the topskull along the sagittal crest may be slightly sloped toward the occiput. The occiput is only minimally defined. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle.
Eyes: Moderate in size, almond in shape, and hazel, amber, or medium to dark brown in color. They eyes are very obliquely set, with the line of the corners forming a 45-degree angle to the horizon. The eye rims are well-fitted, well-pigmented, and heavily lined in black. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed. The eyes should never appear blue in mature individuals.
Ears: Fairly small to medium in size. Set fairly high on the skull, with the inner corners falling in line with the inner corners of the eye when alert. They are triangular in shape, with somewhat rounded tips. Tips orient to the 11 and 1 o’clock positions. The ears are firmly erect and deep, having a sort of cup shape. The ears are never large, long, overly large, or broken.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, deep, and broad at the base, tapering gently toward the nose. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight and level. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Nose: The nose is large, well-pigmented, and black. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Moderately long length to allow for good head carriage and movement. The neck is powerfully muscled with a slight arch when held erect. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and slightly broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap. The neck is seldom held up with proud head carriage, but it is instead held out or slightly below the withers and topline. Length of neck and proper muscle to maintain this carriage is essential.
Chest: Very deep, only slightly broad, and keel-shaped. It should never approach broad, and it should certainly never be wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows in mature individuals, but it may fall short in young dogs, juveniles, and puppies. The forechest is well-developed without being prominent.
Body: The body is narrow and somewhat light, but well put together, showing sufficient substance to allow for power. Its bone is long, yet sturdy, allowing for a steady, ground-covering stride and stability on the hunt without taxing endurance or allowing for injury. The body is never racy, refined, or heavy and cloddy. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Very large, oval, and compact, with long, well-arched toes and tough, black nails and pads (taupe or brown nails are permissible in white specimens). Middle toes are traditionally longer than side toes. Toes are well-webbed for swimming. Dewclaws may be present on forelimbs.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually in a neutral position, but never tucked or carried curled-up over the back. The tail is of a moderate length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to or just before the hock joints when held down. The tail is straight and brush-like.
Movement: The NorthAID has a movement that is unique to itself and the wild wolf. It is nature’s optimal pursuit machine, capable of traveling vast distances (up to 35 miles a day) in pursuit of food. Its long-limbs and narrow body result in single track gaiting at a trot. The head is carried level with, or lower than, the topline. The movement is springy, fluid, energetic, effortless, and efficient. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: Unlike tamed wild wolves and wolf-hybrids, the NorthAID is a breed well-suited for human companionship. Like all dog breeds, they are well-adjusted, stable, and integrate well with people and other animals when socialized and trained from early on. They are overall quiet and laid-back dogs. And although they can look intense and imposing, their ancestry does not include guarding breeds, so their guarding instincts are low. They keep barking to a minimum, but are known to “sing” and howl quite often. To those who know and love them, they are loyal, affectionate, and sociable. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Note: Many NorthAIDs will only have one estrus cycle per year. Also, some intact male NorthAIDs’ testicles remain drawn up at a decreased size (not retained) throughout most of the year, descending and expanding only during the breeding season in response to a female that is ready to breed. This should not be confused with cryptorchidism, which is a fault in any breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 1: Primitive, Pariah, and Feral Breeds

Proportions: Somewhat square to almost rectangular, with length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump, being equal to or only just slightly greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body-height-to-length ratio is approximately between 1:1 and 10:9. Females may be slightly longer. The Northaid’s body is modeled after the Grey Wolf, which is a distance courser built for endurance and stamina over great distances.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat long, mesaticephalic skull type, lupoid, shaped like an elongated wedge, moderate in size, and fairly large in proportion to the rest of the body when compared to other dog breeds. The topskull is fairly broad, being sufficient in breadth to give the head width, and to prevent a narrow or dolichocephalic appearance. The topskull may be flat in profile and between the ears, with smooth, gently sloped, yet powerful temporalis muscles. The rear portion of the topskull along the sagittal crest may be slightly sloped toward the occiput. The occiput is only minimally defined. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle.
Expression: Keen, stern, intense, and watchful.
Stop: The stop may range from shallow to slight. It is never steep or abrupt.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1 with the topskull being equal to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, deep, and broad at the base, tapering gently toward the nose. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight and level. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Lips or Flews: Lips are well-pigmented, black, clean, and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws. The lips should never extend below the lower plane of the bottom jawline.
Nose: The nose is large, well-pigmented, and black. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are powerfully and smoothly muscled.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two large, strong, clean, white teeth. Canines should be large and preferably slightly curved. Bite may be level or scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors.
Eyes: Moderate in size, almond in shape, and hazel, amber, or medium to dark brown in color. They eyes are very obliquely set, with the line of the corners forming a 45-degree angle to the horizon. The eye rims are well-fitted, well-pigmented, and heavily lined in black. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed. The eyes should never appear blue in mature individuals.
Ears: Fairly small to medium in size. Set fairly high on the skull, with the inner corners falling in line with the inner corners of the eye when alert. They are triangular in shape, with somewhat rounded tips. Tips orient to the 11 and 1 o’clock positions. The ears are firmly erect and deep, having a sort of cup shape. The ears are never large, long, overly large, or broken.

Body and Tail

General Description: The body is narrow and somewhat light, but well put together, showing sufficient substance to allow for power. Its bone is long, yet sturdy, allowing for a steady, ground-covering stride and stability on the hunt without taxing endurance or allowing for injury. The body is never racy, refined, or heavy and cloddy. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderately long length to allow for good head carriage and movement. The neck is powerfully muscled with a slight arch when held erect. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and slightly broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap. The neck is seldom held up with proud head carriage, but it is instead held out or slightly below the withers and topline. Length of neck and proper muscle to maintain this carriage is essential.
Chest: Very deep, only slightly broad, and keel-shaped. It should never approach broad, and it should certainly never be wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows in mature individuals, but it may fall short in young dogs, juveniles, and puppies. The forechest is well-developed without being prominent.
Topline: Straight and level, or just slightly (almost imperceptibly) sloped from withers to croup. The back is long, only somewhat broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat and level, or just slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never especially broad, swayed, or roached.
Croup: Broad, long, and gently sloped.
Underline: Slight to moderate tuck-up present, or the underline may appear to run parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, deep, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually in a neutral position, but never tucked or carried curled-up over the back. The tail is of a moderate length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to or just before the hock joints when held down. The tail is straight and brush-like.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Elbows should fall in line directly below the withers. Shoulder blades are long and approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm. Shoulder blades are fairly close together on the dog’s narrow body.
Elbows: Elbows are tucked in close to the narrow body, and may be turned slightly inward and appearing almost under the body. The distance from the withers to the elbows may be equal to, or slightly less than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, of long (yet sturdy) bone, and parallel to one another. The forelimb bones are oval shaped, appearing narrower from the front, as opposed to thick and round.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight, yet wider in profile than from the front due to their oval shape.
Pasterns: Elastic and springy, but never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are long and equal in length, strong, of sturdy bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns may be parallel to one another, or somewhat cow-hocked.
Side View: Due to the sheer length of the hindquarter bones and the natural, wild, wolf-like stance of the NorthAID, the rear pasterns will not always remain parallel to one another or perpendicular to the ground.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to long or well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Very large, oval, and compact, with long, well-arched toes and tough, black nails and pads (taupe or brown nails are permissible in white specimens). Middle toes are traditionally longer than side toes. Toes are well-webbed for swimming. Dewclaws may be present on forelimbs.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The coat of the NorthAID is exactly like that of their wild counterparts, being indistinguishable from wild Canis lupus and never appearing like that of a domestic dog. The fur density and length vary depending on climate and season, being dense and thick in colder climates and winter season, and less dense in spring and summer and milder climates. The difference between a NorthAID’s winter and summer coats can be stark.

NorthAIDs shed only once a year, during the springtime, often “blowing” or “molting” almost the entire undercoat and some of the guard hairs in large clumps between April and May.

The coat is a weather-resistant double-coat with a dense, soft undercoat. The guard hairs are straight, coarse, and banded in color (agouti pattern). The undercoat is thick, wooly, and almost impossible to penetrate.

Cold climate: Short and smooth on the face (with the exception of characteristic cheek ruffs and tufts), topskull, and outer ears, and the front of the forelegs and hind legs. The coat on the neck, body, thighs and tail is somewhat longer, ranging from medium to medium-long length (never silky, wavy, flat, flowing, or feathered) throughout the neck, body, thighs, and tail. It is longest on the neck, shoulders, chest, and dorsal cape, forming a thick mane and frill. This blends into the coat of the body. The inner ears are well-furred.

Mild climate: The mild climate or summer coat is much less dense and can lie somewhat flatter because it is not supported by the dense and thick full undercoat. In fact, it can appear starkly different than the winter coat. The summer coat can reveal much more of the dog’s actual structure, making the dog appear leggier and narrower with a longer and narrower head.
Coat Color or Pattern: The NorthAID can come in any wild-type color, ranging from pure white to black, with all wild-type colors in between, including agouti (also called grizzled or gray) patterns of all colors and shades. Agouti dogs will have a black-tipped tail which may phase to gray (never white) in a phased dog. Agouti animals, as well as some whites and blacks, will also have a dorsal cape. Masks are commonly found on agouti-patterned, grizzle, or gray animals, and in some black agouti dogs, too. White markings or patches on the tail, chest, toes, feet, or face and head of any sort are not permissible. Pink paws and noses are not permissible.

Many NorthAIDs will “phase,” or change color, or lighten as they age. In this instance, a dog can be born completely gray, turn black as an adult, and then slowly phase to a lighter gray or white.

Pups are born naturally camouflaged in muddy brownish, grayish, to black colors with darker shadings at the tips of the guard hairs and extremities, and lighter colors underneath the coat, and on the undersides.

Movement

The NorthAID has a movement that is unique to itself and the wild wolf. It is nature’s optimal pursuit machine, capable of traveling vast distances (up to 35 miles a day) in pursuit of food. Its long-limbs and narrow body result in single track gaiting at a trot. The head is carried level with, or lower than, the topline. The movement is springy, fluid, energetic, effortless, and efficient. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

Unlike tamed wild wolves and wolf-hybrids, the NorthAID is a breed well-suited for human companionship. Like all dog breeds, they are well-adjusted, stable, and integrate well with people and other animals when socialized and trained from early on. They are overall quiet and laid-back dogs. And although they can look intense and imposing, their ancestry does not include guarding breeds, so their guarding instincts are low. They keep barking to a minimum, but are known to “sing” and howl quite often. To those who know and love them, they are loyal, affectionate, and sociable. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed. Note: Many NorthAIDs will only have one estrus cycle per year. Also, some intact male NorthAIDs’ testicles remain drawn up at a decreased size (not retained) throughout most of the year, descending and expanding only during the breeding season in response to a female that is ready to breed. This should not be confused with cryptorchidism, which is a fault in any breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault.