Landseer.jpg
Breed Group Group 9: Large Guardian Pastoral/Mountain Dogs
Sub-group 9-B: Large Pastoral/Mountain Dogs and Related Breeds
Origin Country Switzerland/Germany
Weight Males: 100-156 pounds. Females: 100-156 pounds.
Height Males: 26-32 inches. Females: 26-32 inches.
Other Name(s) Continental Landseer, Continental-European Type, Landseer, Europaisch-Kontinentaler Type, Landseer, European-Continental Type
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD
meet the...

Landseer

Breed Group Group 9: Large Guardian Pastoral/Mountain Dogs
Sub-group 9-B: Large Pastoral/Mountain Dogs and Related Breeds
Origin Country Switzerland/Germany
Weight Males: 100-156 pounds. Females: 100-156 pounds.
Height Males: 26-32 inches. Females: 26-32 inches.
Other Name(s) Continental Landseer, Continental-European Type, Landseer, Europaisch-Kontinentaler Type, Landseer, European-Continental Type
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

Like Labrador, Flat, Golden, and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, the Newfoundland and Landseer breeds are descendants of the now-extinct Canadian landrace: St. John’s Water Dogs. The St. John’s Water Dogs ranged from medium to large in size and were powerful, stocky dogs that roughly resembled modern-day Labrador Retrievers and Newfoundlands. The coats ranged from the smooth coat seen on Labs today to the longer, thicker coats seen on modern-day Newfies and Flat-Coated Retrievers. Many of the St. John’s had white markings in a tuxedo pattern or more extreme white markings no longer found in any of the descendent breeds except that of the Newfoundland and Landseer breeds.

The dogs were known to be well-trained, good-natured, and even-tempered dogs that accompanied their owners in their dories. These dogs were believed to be descendants of Irish, English, French, and Portuguese working dogs brought to the area by immigrants, fishermen, and other wayfarers. Given the tasks of swimming out fishing nets and retrieving game birds for their hunting and fisherman owners, they were renowned for their resiliency, intelligence, power, endurance, and trainability. They were known interchangeably as St. John’s Dog, Newfoundland, and Lesser Newfoundlands. This landrace reached its peak in the 17th century, and from that time on its numbers dwindled. Eventually, the St. John’s Water Dog was divided into two varieties according to size: the Lesser Newfoundland was eventually developed into the modern-day Labrador Retriever in England, while the Greater Newfoundland remained in Canada and developed into the Newfoundland and Landseer breed. The lesser St. John’s dogs accompanied the fishermen in their boats and in hunting, and the Greater St. John’s Water Dogs were given the task of retrieving nets and hauling drowning swimmers back to the safety of the shore or the boat.

Around the late 18th century, St. John’s Water Dogs were imported to England, where they became an immediate hit. Their bravery and merit were especially recognized by Edwin Landseer, a renowned painter who immortalized the black and white variety in several paintings that depicted their gentle and heroic nature. Eventually, these black and white dogs became known as Landseer Dogs. It became apparent that, although the dogs in Continental Europe were often bred back to the Canadian Newfoundland stock, the two lines had become divergent in more than just coat preference. The Canadian varieties were becoming heavier in bone, substance, and coat. They have always been black, as white markings were considered incorrect for the breed. They also have shorter muzzles and are less energetic than the Continental Landseer types, which were still large but leggier, lighter in bone, longer in muzzle, less-profusely coated, and higher energy. The earliest litters of Continental Landseers were born first in Holland and then in Switzerland in the late 19th century and early 20th century. The breed was further developed in the Netherlands and Switzerland, but it was the German Landseer Club that rallied to have them separated from the Newfoundland breed. Eventually, the Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the breed as separate from the Newfoundland breed.

From that point on, both the Newfoundland and the Landseers grew in popularity. Since the large European governing bodies now recognized the Landseer as separate from the Newfoundland, most of Continental Europe followed suit, with the exception of Great Britain. Canada, Great Britain, and the United States consider them the same breed, just different colors, calling the black and white Newfies “Landseer Newfoundlands” to describe the coat color pattern. Continental Kennel Club considers them two distinct varieties of the same breed.

Breed Characteristics

Head: The head of the Continental Landseer is of a moderately large size and proportionate to the rest of the body. The topskull is broad and somewhat arched, both in profile and from the front. The head is well-padded with powerful muscle in the cheeks and temporal area. The occiput is well-developed. Overall, the head may form a large, rough, or blunt wedge.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and ranging from amber to dark brown in color, depending on the coat color. The eyes are somewhat deeply and moderately widely set, with eye rims well-fitted and well-pigmented. There should be no sign of looseness around the eyes. Exposed whites, haw, or pink membranes are incorrect and should be faulted. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: Somewhat small to medium in size, set neither high nor low on the skull, but set just above the level of the eyes, they are not level with the top plane of the skull. Ideally, the outer fold of the ear should line up approximately level with the eye. The ears should not flatten out the plane of the skull by being set too high, nor should they exaggerate the arched skull by being placed too low. The ears should blend smoothly with the head when viewed from any angle. The ears are triangular in shape with rounded to somewhat-rounded tips. The inner edge should hang close to the head. When the tips are held forward, the tip should reach the inner corner of the eye.
Muzzle: The muzzle is strong, full, deep, and broad throughout. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak. The muzzle should appear squared rather than tapered.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and strongly muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is relatively clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Body: Compact, solid, and of good substance. Substantial, deep, broad, and of good length, with moderately strong and solid bone substance and powerful muscle throughout. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup, but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually downward or just above/at the level of the topline, never tucked or carried up over the back. The tail is of a moderately long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, gently curved, or curved toward the end.
Movement: Powerful, yet athletic, energetic, efficient, effortless, and tireless. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: Both the Newfoundland and Landseer are known as gentle giants. They are renowned for their patience, loyalty, serene nature and courage. They are friendly toward other dogs, animals, people, and are especially fond of children. The Newfoundland is known for his calm demeanor, while the Continental Landseer is described as a bit more energetic. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for these breeds.
Click Here to View Full Standard

Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 9: Large Guardian Pastoral/Mountain Dogs

Proportions: Somewhat off-square in proportions, with length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump, being just slightly greater than, or almost equal to, the height at the withers. A correct topline length (from withers to the base of the tail) should equal twice the length of the head. The ideal body-height-to-length ratio is 10:9. Females may be slightly longer. The dog’s height comes from the length of the leg, as opposed to the depth of the body, as in the Newfoundland. The body is well put together, with sturdy substance and somewhat strong—yet never overly heavy—bone. Males should appear masculine, being more substantial in size and mass, while females should appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type.

Head

General Appearance: The head of the Continental Landseer is of a moderately large size and proportionate to the rest of the body. The topskull is broad and somewhat arched, both in profile and from the front. The head is well-padded with powerful muscle in the cheeks and temporal area. The occiput is well-developed. Overall, the head may form a large, rough, or blunt wedge.
Expression: Noble, gentle, soft, and kindly.
Stop: The Landseer’s stop is moderate, but because of a sleeker head coat it does not appear as abrupt as that of the Newfoundland.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is may range from 3:2 to 4:3, with the topskull being just slightly greater than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis may be convergent to almost parallel.
Muzzle: The muzzle is strong, full, deep, and broad throughout. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak. The muzzle should appear squared rather than tapered.
Lips or Flews: Lips are fairly clean and well-fitted over the teeth and jaws. The lips and flews are only moderately thick and sufficient in length to reach the lower plane of the jaw, giving the muzzle its deep, square or rectangular appearance. The flews should never be pendulous or “wet.”
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are powerfully muscled and well-developed. They should gradually taper toward the muzzle.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, scissor, or reverse-scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and ranging from amber to dark brown in color, depending on the coat color. The eyes are somewhat deeply and moderately widely set, with eye rims well-fitted and well-pigmented. There should be no sign of looseness around the eyes. Exposed whites, haw, or pink membranes are incorrect and should be faulted. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: Somewhat small to medium in size, set neither high nor low on the skull, but set just above the level of the eyes, they are not level with the top plane of the skull. Ideally, the outer fold of the ear should line up approximately level with the eye. The ears should not flatten out the plane of the skull by being set too high, nor should they exaggerate the arched skull by being placed too low. The ears should blend smoothly with the head when viewed from any angle. The ears are triangular in shape with rounded to somewhat-rounded tips. The inner edge should hang close to the head. When the tips are held forward, the tip should reach the inner corner of the eye.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, solid, and of good substance. Substantial, deep, broad, and of good length, with moderately strong and solid bone substance and powerful muscle throughout. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and strongly muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is relatively clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Topline: Level from slightly prominent withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat and level, or slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Gently sloped.
Underline: Slight tuck-up present, or the underline may run parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup, but as a natural extension of the topline. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually downward or just above/at the level of the topline, never tucked or carried up over the back. The tail is of a moderately long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, gently curved, or curved toward the end.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The distance from the withers to the brisket may be equal to, or just greater than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, of solid bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of solid bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: Moderately long, straight or slightly wavy, coarse, oily, water-resistent outercoat, and soft, dense undercoat. Shorter on face and front of legs.
Coat Color or Pattern: White with distinct black patches.

Movement

Powerful, yet athletic, energetic, efficient, effortless, and tireless. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

Both the Newfoundland and Landseer are known as gentle giants. They are renowned for their patience, loyalty, serene nature and courage. They are friendly toward other dogs, animals, people, and are especially fond of children. The Newfoundland is known for his calm demeanor, while the Continental Landseer is described as a bit more energetic. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for these breeds.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.