Dogue De Bordeaux.jpg
Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country France
Weight Males: 110-0 pounds. Females: 99-0 pounds.
Height Males: 23-27 inches. Females: 22-26 inches.
Other Name(s) Bordeaux Bulldog, Bordeaux Dog, Bordeaux Mastiff, BordeauxDogge, Dogo De BurDeos, French Mastiff
Breed Type Pure
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meet the...

Dogue de Bordeaux

Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country France
Weight Males: 110-0 pounds. Females: 99-0 pounds.
Height Males: 23-27 inches. Females: 22-26 inches.
Other Name(s) Bordeaux Bulldog, Bordeaux Dog, Bordeaux Mastiff, BordeauxDogge, Dogo De BurDeos, French Mastiff
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

France

Breed Characteristics

Head: The skull is slightly brachycephalic, appearing somewhat large in size, but always in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is broad, somewhat angular, and substantial in bone and muscling. It is mostly clean-cut; however, a few wrinkles on the forehead are permissible when the dog is alert. A median furrow starts at the stop and disappears toward the occiput. The temporal muscles and cheeks are pronounced, very broad, and very well-developed. The forehead is prominent, being wider than high, and without overhang or interference. The brows are also well-developed. The topskull is well-padded with temporal muscles, it should be at least as wide (measured from one side to the other in front of the ears) as it is long (from occiput to stop). The cheeks should be at least as broad as the topskull. In profile, the topskull appears somewhat arched, yet may be either slightly arched or flat across the plane when viewed from the front.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to lemon-shaped, spaced well-apart and hazel or amber to light brown in color. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Loose eye lids, excess skin, exposed haws, any sign of entropion or ectropion, or any other eye abnormality or disorder are incorrect.
Ears: Somewhat small to medium in size and triangular in shape, with rounded tips. They are set high on the skull, wide apart, and drop. The fold of the ears is set level with the plane of the head, enhancing the width of the skull when viewed from the front. There is a slight lift at the base, with the inner edge of the leather lying close to the head. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken. Tips of the ear must not extend beyond the eye when held forward.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep, and full, with little to no taper. The plane of the muzzle may be horizontal or just slightly concave. The nose sits just behind the line of the end of the muzzle. It is without excess skin or flews. Upper and lower jaws are wide, have good bone substance, and are strong and well-developed, never appearing snipy or weak. They may be equal in length, or with a slightly longer lower jaw. The lower jaw is slightly curved and just slightly undershot, creating a prominent, yet not protrusive, chin. The chin should not extend beyond the break of the upper lip, nor should it be covered by the upper lip. The lower plane of the muzzle is rounded, an impression created by properly fitted lips.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and self-colored according to the mask or the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Moderate length, powerfully muscled, and thick throughout, with a slight arch. The neck tapers only slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The skin on the neck is slightly loose, however, and should not appear pendulous or with exaggerated dewlap.
Chest: Long, deep, and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of, or just below the point of, the elbow. Depth of the chest is equal to or just slightly greater than the distance from the elbow to the ground.
Body: Solid, deep, full, and substantial. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set somewhat low on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, often level with or slightly above the level of the topline. It should never be carried tucked or curved up over the back. It is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved. It should never be kinked or atrophied.
Movement: Powerful, yet supple and agile. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Dogue de Bordeaux is renowned for his guarding instincts, which complement his great strength and size. Due to his tendency to bond strongly toward his people or family and strong protective instincts, it is highly recommended that he be socialized and trained from early puppyhood, which will ensure that he develops his ability to discern friend from foe. Used to fight since antiquity, this breed is also notoriously aggressive toward other animals, especially other dogs of the same sex. Again, early positive socialization should curb much of this. With their families and people, they are very affectionate and loving dogs. They are gentle, self-composed, and calm. However, they can appear indifferent or aloof toward anyone unfamiliar. They can also be somewhat stubborn, but proper motivation using positive reinforcement training methods will help to motivate them in many training disciplines. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds

Proportions: Rectangular in proportions with length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump being just slightly greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body height to length ratio is between 11:10 to 5:4. The body is substantial in bone, muscle, and size. It is well-put together, and capable of great strength and agility. Preference should be placed over soundness and quality, as opposed to sheer size alone. A lesser sized specimen can be given preference if all of the elements of quality and soundness are present.

Head

General Appearance: The skull is slightly brachycephalic, appearing somewhat large in size, but always in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is broad, somewhat angular, and substantial in bone and muscling. It is mostly clean-cut; however, a few wrinkles on the forehead are permissible when the dog is alert. A median furrow starts at the stop and disappears toward the occiput. The temporal muscles and cheeks are pronounced, very broad, and very well-developed. The forehead is prominent, being wider than high, and without overhang or interference. The brows are also well-developed. The topskull is well-padded with temporal muscles, it should be at least as wide (measured from one side to the other in front of the ears) as it is long (from occiput to stop). The cheeks should be at least as broad as the topskull. In profile, the topskull appears somewhat arched, yet may be either slightly arched or flat across the plane when viewed from the front.
Expression: Regal, self-composed, watchful, and self-confident.
Stop: The stop is definite, preferably forming a 90- to 95-degree angle between the topskull and muzzle.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is between 1:3 and 1:4, with the topskull being just longer than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is sharply convergent.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep, and full, with little to no taper. The plane of the muzzle may be horizontal or just slightly concave. The nose sits just behind the line of the end of the muzzle. It is without excess skin or flews. Upper and lower jaws are wide, have good bone substance, and are strong and well-developed, never appearing snipy or weak. They may be equal in length, or with a slightly longer lower jaw. The lower jaw is slightly curved and just slightly undershot, creating a prominent, yet not protrusive, chin. The chin should not extend beyond the break of the upper lip, nor should it be covered by the upper lip. The lower plane of the muzzle is rounded, an impression created by properly fitted lips.
Lips or Flews: Lips are full and thick, yet fit well over the teeth and jaws. They should not appear overly pendulous or elongated. In profile, they should be thick enough to give the lower plane of the muzzle a rounded profile. The lips should just cover the lower jaw on either side. Front edges of the lips meet in front of the incisors, forming an upside-down “V”. Neither the teeth nor the tongue should show when the mouth is shut.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and self-colored according to the mask or the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: Cheeks are prominent, broad, and powerfully muscled. They should never appear chiseled or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, reverse-scissor, or undershot. Contact preferred between upper and lower incisors, but lower jaw may be undershot up to 1/4th of an inch. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to lemon-shaped, spaced well-apart and hazel or amber to light brown in color. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Loose eye lids, excess skin, exposed haws, any sign of entropion or ectropion, or any other eye abnormality or disorder are incorrect.
Ears: Somewhat small to medium in size and triangular in shape, with rounded tips. They are set high on the skull, wide apart, and drop. The fold of the ears is set level with the plane of the head, enhancing the width of the skull when viewed from the front. There is a slight lift at the base, with the inner edge of the leather lying close to the head. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken. Tips of the ear must not extend beyond the eye when held forward.

Body and Tail

General Description: Solid, deep, full, and substantial. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderate length, powerfully muscled, and thick throughout, with a slight arch. The neck tapers only slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The skin on the neck is slightly loose, however, and should not appear pendulous or with exaggerated dewlap.
Chest: Long, deep, and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of, or just below the point of, the elbow. Depth of the chest is equal to or just slightly greater than the distance from the elbow to the ground.
Topline: Level from slightly prominent withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is short, broad, taut, flat and level, or slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Broad and gently sloped.
Underline: Slight to moderate tuck up present, or the underline may run parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set somewhat low on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, often level with or slightly above the level of the topline. It should never be carried tucked or curved up over the back. It is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved. It should never be kinked or atrophied.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The distance from the withers to the brisket may be equal to, or just greater than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, good muscle, solid bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of solid bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: The skin is well-fitted, yet elastic throughout. It should never appear loose or pendulous, or obstruct the dog’s outline in anyway.
Coat Type: The coat is fine, short, soft, smooth, and soft to the touch.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Dogue De Bordeaux breed; the standard color and nonstandard color variety;
Standard Coat Color Variety: All shades of red fawn, including mahogany, apricot, Isabella, and dark red fawn to light fawn. With or without masks in the following colors: brown, liver, liver-red, bistre, Isabella, or black mask. The mask must not extend beyond the muzzle. Some darker shading permissible on the skull, ears, and back. Small amount of white permissible on the chest and tips of the toes.
Non-Standard Coat Color Variety: Liver, white that extends beyond a patch on the chest.

Movement

Powerful, yet supple and agile. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Dogue de Bordeaux is renowned for his guarding instincts, which complement his great strength and size. Due to his tendency to bond strongly toward his people or family and strong protective instincts, it is highly recommended that he be socialized and trained from early puppyhood, which will ensure that he develops his ability to discern friend from foe. Used to fight since antiquity, this breed is also notoriously aggressive toward other animals, especially other dogs of the same sex. Again, early positive socialization should curb much of this. With their families and people, they are very affectionate and loving dogs. They are gentle, self-composed, and calm. However, they can appear indifferent or aloof toward anyone unfamiliar. They can also be somewhat stubborn, but proper motivation using positive reinforcement training methods will help to motivate them in many training disciplines. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.