Chinese Crested.jpg
Breed Group Group 12: Companion and Toy Breeds
Sub-group 12-B: Asian Breeds
Origin Country China
Weight Males: 5-13 pounds. Females: 5-13 pounds.
Height Males: 11-13 inches. Females: 9-12 inches.
Other Name(s) Chinese Crested Dogs
Breed Type Pure
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Chinese Crested

Breed Group Group 12: Companion and Toy Breeds
Sub-group 12-B: Asian Breeds
Origin Country China
Weight Males: 5-13 pounds. Females: 5-13 pounds.
Height Males: 11-13 inches. Females: 9-12 inches.
Other Name(s) Chinese Crested Dogs
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

Found throughout the world, hairless dogs have been considered a charming anomaly for thousands of years. It is believed that all of the modern day hairless breeds, with the exception of the American Hairless Terrier and Rat Terrier-Hairless varieties, descended from the hairless dogs of Africa. It is believed that these dogs were first taken outside of their native continent by ancient Chinese traders who found them to be useful pest control for ships. Hairless dogs started showing up as early as the 1500s in Central America, South America, various Asian cities, and, of course, their native country of Africa.

Due to the dog’s unique physical appearance, these hairless ancestors of today’s Chinese Crested, or Cresteds, were brought back to the mainland as gifts and traded in ports throughout the world. In China, the dogs were used primarily as companion animals, hunting dogs, and food sources. Two types were popular throughout China: the one known as the “deer type” was used primarily for companionship, and the stockier, stronger hunting “cobby” type. The dogs were eventually refined into the breed that we see today. In addition to the two types, the Chinese Crested also exhibits two coat varieties: the Hairless Crested and the well-furred Powderpuff.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat mesaticephalic skull-type, moderate in size, distinctly wedge-shaped, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is clean-cut, without excess skin or wrinkle. The topskull is gently arched between the ears when viewed from the front, and flat when viewed from the profile.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and medium to dark brown in color, but may be self-colored to amber or hazel (in liver colored or dilute specimens). The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented, with little to no white visible when the dog is looking forward. They are set somewhat wide apart. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: Set somewhat well up on the skull and firmly erect, except in Powderpuffs, in which the coat may pull the ears to a drop position. Ears may be fully fringed or shaved.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, deep, and well-developed. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance, appearing strong and well-developed, never appearing snipey or weak. The muzzle tapers to form a wedge-shape, but should never appear pointed.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Moderately long to allow for proud head carriage and well-muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deeper than broad with the brisket extending to the point of the elbows.
Body: The body is lithe, supple, and somewhat long, giving the rectangular body proportion. It is graceful and exhibits good substance. The body is never racy like that of a Whippet, nor so cobby as to appear Pug-like. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Round, oval, or narrow and elongated (harelike). Compact, with well-arched, or elongated toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, in motion, the tail is carried slightly forward, over the back. When at rest, the tail may be lowered but never tucked. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. It may be straight, or it may form a graceful curve, “sabre,” “hook,” or “sickle.”
The tail is long and tapers from a broader base to the finer tip. It is set high on the croup. When held down, the tip of the tail should extend to the hock joints.
Movement: The movement is springy, lively, agile, flowing, and elegant. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Chinese Crested’s temperament is charming, lively, affectionate, happy, alert, friendly, interested, and quite intelligent. They are sociable, good with other dogs, and good with people. They excel in many disciplines, including agility, obedience, lure coursing, and much more. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 12: Companion and Toy Breeds

Proportions: Somewhat rectangular, with the body length from the point of the chest to the point of the rump being slightly greater than the height at the withers, with an ideal proportion of height to length being between 4:5 and 9:10. The body is well-put together, featuring sturdy substance and fine to medium bone, with the cobby type being slightly heavier in bone and substance than the finer-boned deer type.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat mesaticephalic skull-type, moderate in size, distinctly wedge-shaped, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is clean-cut, without excess skin or wrinkle. The topskull is gently arched between the ears when viewed from the front, and flat when viewed from the profile.
Expression: Alert, inquisitive, engaged, intelligent, and intense.
Stop: The stop is distinct, being slightly pronounced but not overly defined.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1, with the topskull being equal in length to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis may be parallel, or may be just slightly convergent.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, deep, and well-developed. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance, appearing strong and well-developed, never appearing snipey or weak. The muzzle tapers to form a wedge-shape, but should never appear pointed.
Lips or Flews: Lips are clean and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks may be smooth, or may appear with light padding. They are never prominent or coarse, but taper toward the muzzle.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth, however, hairless dogs are not to be penalized for missing teeth, a trait associated with hairlessness. Bite may be level, scissor, or reverse-scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and medium to dark brown in color, but may be self-colored to amber or hazel (in liver colored or dilute specimens). The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented, with little to no white visible when the dog is looking forward. They are set somewhat wide apart. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: Set somewhat well up on the skull and firmly erect, except in Powderpuffs, in which the coat may pull the ears to a drop position. Ears may be fully fringed or shaved.

Body and Tail

General Description: The body is lithe, supple, and somewhat long, giving the rectangular body proportion. It is graceful and exhibits good substance. The body is never racy like that of a Whippet, nor so cobby as to appear Pug-like. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderately long to allow for proud head carriage and well-muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deeper than broad with the brisket extending to the point of the elbows.
Topline: Level from withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat, and level. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Flat and level with the back, or gently sloped.
Underline: Slight to moderate tuck up present. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, in motion, the tail is carried slightly forward, over the back. When at rest, the tail may be lowered but never tucked. The tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. It may be straight, or it may form a graceful curve, “sabre,” “hook,” or “sickle.”
The tail is long and tapers from a broader base to the finer tip. It is set high on the croup. When held down, the tip of the tail should extend to the hock joints.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbows is approximately half the dog’s height at the withers.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, somewhat fine to medium bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of somewhat fine to medium bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Round, oval, or narrow and elongated (harelike). Compact, with well-arched, or elongated toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The Chinese Crested comes in two coat varieties; the Hairless and the Powderpuff;
Hairless: Hairless on body, with soft, silky, and flowing hair of any length present on head and ears, including a sparse or flowing (preferred) crest, plumed or partially plumed tail, "socks" on feet. Hairless dogs will have a sparsely, partially, or fully plumed tail. Some hairless individuals can have more hair. Hair may be present on the face and muzzle and is permissible, or it may be trimmed/shaved for neatness. Ears may be left fully plumed, or they may be trimmed for neatness.
Powderpuff: Coat may be single or double coat. Entire body veiled in soft, silky veil. Outer coat long and thin, undercoat short and silky. Powder puffs will have a fully plumed tail. Some individuals will have less hair. Hair is present on the face and muzzle and is permissible, or it may be trimmed/shaved for neatness. Ears may be left fully plumed, or it may be trimmed for neatness.
Coat Color or Pattern: All coat colors and patterns are equally permissible.

Movement

The movement is springy, lively, agile, flowing, and elegant. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Chinese Crested’s temperament is charming, lively, affectionate, happy, alert, friendly, interested, and quite intelligent. They are sociable, good with other dogs, and good with people. They excel in many disciplines, including agility, obedience, lure coursing, and much more. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.