BullMastiff.jpg
Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Great Britain
Weight Males: 110-130 pounds. Females: 90-120 pounds.
Height Males: 25-27 inches. Females: 24-26 inches.
Other Name(s) Bull Mastiff, BullMastiff
Breed Type Pure
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Bullmastiff

Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Great Britain
Weight Males: 110-130 pounds. Females: 90-120 pounds.
Height Males: 25-27 inches. Females: 24-26 inches.
Other Name(s) Bull Mastiff, BullMastiff
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

In the 1800s, poaching on large estates became such a problem that violators were willing to risk the death penalty to hunt on forbidden lands. In order to apprehend criminals violating poaching laws, English game wardens and gamekeepers needed a dog that was large and powerful, possessing the stamina and agility needed to bring down poachers of any size. The wardens bred the large and imposing English Mastiff (approximately 40%) to the old-time Bulldog (approximately 60%) to produce a dog that was fearsome in appearance, but perfectly capable of tracking and apprehending poachers across various types of terrain. Another feature of the Bullmastiff, also known as the Gamekeeper’s Night Dog, was his ability to stalk poachers in complete silence without giving off so much as a warning growl.

Eventually, the need for dogs in game keeping waned, and the Bullmastiff was appreciated for his other characteristics. Since the first Bullmastiff was recognized as a purebred in 1924, both the breed standard and the dog himself have undergone several changes and transformations. Today, the Bullmastiff is still a wonderful watchdog, and much has been done to reshape his once-tenacious temperament to a calmer one.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat brachycephalic skull type, moderate in size and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle. It is broad and deep, with both skull and muzzle appearing blocky from all angles. The head is strongly muscled, having well-developed cheek and temporal muscles. Some wrinkling may be present when the ears and brows are brought to alert, but overall the head is clean-cut and free from excess skin. The topskull should be as broad (from one side to the other measured in front of the ears) as it is long (from occiput to stop). It is flat when viewed from the front or in profile. A median furrow starting at the stop, and fading toward the occiput may be visible.
Eyes: Moderate in size, from oval to open-almond to lemon in shape, with various shades of brown in color. Amber is permissible in nonstandard colors. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. There should be no sign of looseness, exposed haws or whites, or entropion or ectropion. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are somewhat small to moderate in size, set high on the skull and very far back, giving the topline of the skull a broad flat appearance and being nearly even with the occiput. They are V-shaped, and may be drop, buttoned, or rose, with preference given to ears featuring inner edges that lie close to the cheeks and head. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep, and full. It is shorter than the domed topskull. The muzzle is broad at the base and remains broad throughout to the tip of the nose. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance and are strong and well developed, never appearing long and narrow or snipy or weak.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in nonstandard varieties. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Moderate length allows for proud head carriage. It is powerfully muscled and very thick, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Body: Compact, deep, solid, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, pump-handled, or gently curved.
Movement: The movement is powerful, intent, and agile. There should be no rolling or heavy action. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Bullmastiff is a confident, self-composed, and fearless dog. He is loyal, intelligent, and a great family companion. Due to his size and strength, early socialization and training should be implemented to ensure that he doesn’t accidently clobber his people out of excitement. True to his original purpose, he is a great watchdog. Mature individuals may be unconcerned with or indifferent towards strangers. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds

Proportions: Slightly off-square to somewhat rectangular in proportions, with the length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump, being slightly greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body-height-to-length ratio is between 5:4 and 10:9. The body is well put together, featuring sturdy substance and solid bone. The Bullmastiff should appear powerful and agile, never appearing heavy and cumbersome nor light and racy. A lesser-sized specimen can be given preference if all of the elements of quality and soundness are present.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat brachycephalic skull type, moderate in size and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is clean-cut without excess skin or wrinkle. It is broad and deep, with both skull and muzzle appearing blocky from all angles. The head is strongly muscled, having well-developed cheek and temporal muscles. Some wrinkling may be present when the ears and brows are brought to alert, but overall the head is clean-cut and free from excess skin. The topskull should be as broad (from one side to the other measured in front of the ears) as it is long (from occiput to stop). It is flat when viewed from the front or in profile. A median furrow starting at the stop, and fading toward the occiput may be visible.
Expression: Alert, watchful, intelligent, and keen.
Stop: The stop is moderate to definite and pronounced, preferably forming a 90-degree angle between the topskull and muzzle.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:3, with the topskull being longer than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel.
Muzzle: The muzzle is broad, deep, and full. It is shorter than the domed topskull. The muzzle is broad at the base and remains broad throughout to the tip of the nose. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance and are strong and well developed, never appearing long and narrow or snipy or weak.
Lips or Flews: Lips fit rather well over the teeth and jaws. Flews are not too pendulous and should never extend beyond the line of the lower jaw.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in nonstandard varieties. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are well-filled and strongly muscled. They should never appear flat or chiseled.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, scissor, reverse-scissor, or very slightly undershot. Contact between the top and bottom incisors is preferred, but a space of 1/8 of an inch is permissible. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized. Teeth and tongue should be completely concealed when the mouth is closed. Upper and lower jaws are broad and strong.
Eyes: Moderate in size, from oval to open-almond to lemon in shape, with various shades of brown in color. Amber is permissible in nonstandard colors. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. There should be no sign of looseness, exposed haws or whites, or entropion or ectropion. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are somewhat small to moderate in size, set high on the skull and very far back, giving the topline of the skull a broad flat appearance and being nearly even with the occiput. They are V-shaped, and may be drop, buttoned, or rose, with preference given to ears featuring inner edges that lie close to the cheeks and head. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, deep, solid, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderate length allows for proud head carriage. It is powerfully muscled and very thick, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows.
Topline: Level from withers to croup. The back is short, broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut and flat and level or slightly arched, yet supportive. The topline is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Broad, powerful, and gently sloped.
Underline: Slightly tucked up or running parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tail is of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, pump-handled, or gently curved.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbows is approximately half the dog’s height at the withers.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle and solid bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of solid bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated, with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The Bullmastiff comes in two coat varieties: the standard smooth-coat type and the nonstandard long-coat type.
Smooth-coat variety: The coat is short, smooth, sleek, and close to the body throughout. The texture is hard and protective. The undercoat is dense and soft. Fringe or feather is not permissible.
Long-coat variety: The coat is shorter on the face, forehead, and front of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. The coat is longer, forming a ruff on the neck, and fringing or feathering on the ears, rear of the forelimbs and hindlimbs, feet, and tail, forming well-developed fringe and furnishings. Undercoats are soft and dense. The coat should never appear abundantly thick or silky.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Bullmastiff breed: the standard color and nonstandard color variety.
Standard Coat Color Variety: Various shades of fawn (various shades of tan to red with black mask), any shade of brindle, both with a dark black mask and darker shaded ears. Small amount of white on the chest is permissible.
Nonstandard Coat Color Variety: Liver, smoky Dudley, Isabella Dudley, any of the previously listed standard or nonstandard colors with larger degree of white markings.

Movement

The movement is powerful, intent, and agile. There should be no rolling or heavy action. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Bullmastiff is a confident, self-composed, and fearless dog. He is loyal, intelligent, and a great family companion. Due to his size and strength, early socialization and training should be implemented to ensure that he doesn’t accidently clobber his people out of excitement. True to his original purpose, he is a great watchdog. Mature individuals may be unconcerned with or indifferent towards strangers. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.