BOXER.jpg
Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Germany
Weight Males: 66-70 pounds. Females: 55-62 pounds.
Height Males: 22-25 inches. Females: 21-24 inches.
Other Name(s) Deutscher Boxer, German Boxer
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD
meet the...

Boxer

Breed Group Group 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Germany
Weight Males: 66-70 pounds. Females: 55-62 pounds.
Height Males: 22-25 inches. Females: 21-24 inches.
Other Name(s) Deutscher Boxer, German Boxer
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Breed Spotlight

Origins

The modern day Boxer can be traced back 4,000 years to the ancient Mesopotamian city of Molossus, where the Assyrians used the Molossian dog to dominate the battlefield. These dogs were renowned for their size, power, strength, and tenacity, and their modern-day descendants (Mastiffs and Bulldogs) continue in that tradition. Eventually, the reputation of the Molossian dogs preceded the breed. The value of Molossian dogs became widely recognized, and the dogs’ popularity began to spread throughout the Middle East. Eventually, descendants of these dogs found their way to Germany, where they were known as the “Bull-biters,” or Bullenbisers, which were used for centuries to capture and hold, or bait, large game such as cattle and deer until the hunters could arrive and properly dispatch the animal. Eventually a smaller, more agile Bullenbiser was developed in Brabant, Belgium, which was used as the foundation stock of today’s agile and powerful Boxer.

It wasn’t until the late 1800s that three gentlemen from Munich, Germany—R. Hopner, Elard Konig, and Friedrich Robert—decided to develop these dogs into their own separate breed. In 1895, the first Boxer exhibition dog show was held in Munich, and the following year, the first Boxer breed club was established: the Deutscher Boxer Club, which later established the original breed standard. From Germany, the breed’s popularity rose and spread through the rest of Europe, and finally, in the late nineteenth century, the Boxer arrived on American soil. However, it wouldn’t be until after World War II that the Boxer began to rise in popularity in the United States.

Since the end of World War II, the Boxer has been recognized and celebrated as a popular, capable, and loyal companion and working dog. He has served in many capacities, from war dog to farm dog. Today, he can often be seen strutting around the show ring or working as a therapy dog, but many simply know the Boxer as a faithful and beloved family companion.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat brachycephalic skull-type, having a fairly short muzzle and slight upturn to the lower jaw. However, it should never appear as an extreme brachycephalic skull, as seen in dogs that are completely lacking length of muzzle, or with an extreme upturned lower jaw. The head is moderate in size, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The skull, when viewed from the front or profile, is slightly arched and never prominently rounded or flat, with a median furrow that starts at the stop and progresses toward the back of the skull. The occiput is visible, but not distinct or pronounced. The head may be chiseled, or slightly padded with smooth (never bulky) muscle to denote strength. The head is free of wrinkle and excess skin, although some folds on the forehead and topskull may appear when the dog is alerted.
Eyes: The eyes are large, lemon-shaped or open almond, dark brown in color, and set somewhat wide apart. The eyes should never appear almond, oblique, narrow, overly round, too deeply set, or bulging. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. Inner eyelid membranes are preferred to be darkly pigmented and not pink. Exposure of whites or haws, drooping of the eyelids, or rolling of the eyelids (either inwards or outwards) is incorrect. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: Ears are set high on the skull and wide apart at the outer edge of the skull. They may be naturally drop or cropped long. Natural ears are moderate in size, v-shaped, broad at the base, somewhat short, with the inner edge and tip falling close to the head in repose. Tips will come forward when alert. Cropped ears should be cropped long and tapering. Improperly cropped ears are not to be penalized.
Nose: The nose is large, well-pigmented, and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened, never appearing narrowed or closed. The nose is never excessively pushed into the stop, but sits at the end of the muzzle, or just before the rounding of the end of the muzzle.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage, strongly-muscled, and distinctively arched. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep, broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows. The forechest is well defined, yet not overly prominent.
Body: Compact, solid, deep, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip, the tail may be left natural or docked short. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked. Natural tails (preferred) are of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. They may be straight or gently curved. Docked tails should never be completely removed, leaving at minimum three vertebrae. The tail should never be kinked, or screwed.
Movement: The Boxer’s movement is agile, springy, and powerful. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Boxer’s temperament is one of the breed’s most popular traits. The temperament is confident, devoted, eager, and watchful. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
Click Here to View Full Standard

Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 3: Molossoids and Mastiffs Breeds

Proportions: Square with length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump being equal to the height at the withers. The ideal body height to length ratio is between 10:10 and 10:9. Females may be slightly longer. The body is well-put together, with sturdy substance and medium bone. Males should appear masculine, being more substantial in size and mass, while females should appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat brachycephalic skull-type, having a fairly short muzzle and slight upturn to the lower jaw. However, it should never appear as an extreme brachycephalic skull, as seen in dogs that are completely lacking length of muzzle, or with an extreme upturned lower jaw. The head is moderate in size, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The skull, when viewed from the front or profile, is slightly arched and never prominently rounded or flat, with a median furrow that starts at the stop and progresses toward the back of the skull. The occiput is visible, but not distinct or pronounced. The head may be chiseled, or slightly padded with smooth (never bulky) muscle to denote strength. The head is free of wrinkle and excess skin, although some folds on the forehead and topskull may appear when the dog is alerted.
Expression: Alert, intelligent, confident, and capable.
Stop: The stop is definite, preferably forming a 90-degree angle between the topskull and muzzle.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is between 1:3 to 1:4, with the topskull being longer than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is somewhat convergent.
Lips or Flews: Lips are thick, broad, somewhat padded, and slightly loose. They are never overly droopy or pendulous. They fit snugly over the teeth and cover the jaws well. The upper and lower lip edges meet in front of the incisors, never covering the chin or lower lip. In profile and from the front, the chin should be strongly developed and distinguishable, yet not protrusive and extending beyond the lips/flews.
Nose: The nose is large, well-pigmented, and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well-opened, never appearing narrowed or closed. The nose is never excessively pushed into the stop, but sits at the end of the muzzle, or just before the rounding of the end of the muzzle.
Cheeks: Cheeks may appear smooth, or with slight padding of muscle to denote strength. The cheeks should not appear bulky or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, reverse-scissor, or just slightly undershot with no more than 1/4 of an inch of space between top and bottom incisors. Reverse-scissor bite or slight undershot bite preferred.
Eyes: The eyes are large, lemon-shaped or open almond, dark brown in color, and set somewhat wide apart. The eyes should never appear almond, oblique, narrow, overly round, too deeply set, or bulging. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. Inner eyelid membranes are preferred to be darkly pigmented and not pink. Exposure of whites or haws, drooping of the eyelids, or rolling of the eyelids (either inwards or outwards) is incorrect. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: Ears are set high on the skull and wide apart at the outer edge of the skull. They may be naturally drop or cropped long. Natural ears are moderate in size, v-shaped, broad at the base, somewhat short, with the inner edge and tip falling close to the head in repose. Tips will come forward when alert. Cropped ears should be cropped long and tapering. Improperly cropped ears are not to be penalized.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, solid, deep, and of good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage, strongly-muscled, and distinctively arched. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep, broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows. The forechest is well defined, yet not overly prominent.
Topline: Straight, yet gently sloped from prominent withers to croup. The back is short, broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, and may be flat and level, or just slightly (almost imperceptibly) arched, yet supportive. The back is never level when standing, swayed, or roached. The topline may level out as the dog moves.
Croup: Gently sloped and in line with the rest of the topline. It is strong, straight, and muscular. In females the croup and pelvis may be slightly longer, and somewhat wider.
Underline: The underline is short, tight, with a slight tuck up. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip, the tail may be left natural or docked short. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked. Natural tails (preferred) are of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. They may be straight or gently curved. Docked tails should never be completely removed, leaving at minimum three vertebrae. The tail should never be kinked, or screwed.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbows is approximately half the dog’s height at the withers.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle and bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of good bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The coat is short, smooth, close and fitting to the body throughout. The texture is hard and glossy. No fringe or feather permissible.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Boxer breed: the standard color and nonstandard color variety.
Standard color variety: various shades of fawn (light tan to mahogany always with black mask), light brindle fawn (with black mask), all with or without white tuxedo markings. From root of nose, folds are always indicated running in a downward direction on both sides. Note: all standard colored boxers should have a clearly distinguished mask confined to the muzzle that appears in sharp contrast to the rest of the coat. White markings on standard colors are restricted to 1/3 of the dog’s entire coat and should not appear on the body, flanks, back, or torso.
Non-standard color variety: Solid white, black, reverse-brindle, or seal, all with or without white markings, or primarily white with markings in the previously listed colors and patterns. From root of nose, folds are always indicated running in a downward direction on both sides.

Movement

The Boxer’s movement is agile, springy, and powerful. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Boxer’s temperament is one of the breed’s most popular traits. The temperament is confident, devoted, eager, and watchful. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.