Majestic Tree hound.jpg
Breed Group Group 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 80-110 pounds. Females: 75-100 pounds.
Height Males: 26-30 inches. Females: 24-28 inches.
Breed Type Pure
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meet the...

Majestic Tree Hound

Breed Group Group 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country United States
Weight Males: 80-110 pounds. Females: 75-100 pounds.
Height Males: 26-30 inches. Females: 24-28 inches.
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

Before the time of sport hunting, large, methodical, cold-nosed dogs were the standard dogs used for hunting large game such as bear. Prized for their slower pace, melodic baying, and steadfast working ability, these dogs were the progenitors of the old-type Saint Hubert’s hounds, blood hounds, and Gascogne hounds. During the 15th and 16th centuries, France experienced political and religious unrest that resulted in a large wave of emigration. French families uprooted from their home country and settled in various places in the new world, from Canada and New England all the way down to the Caribbean and the Gulf Coast. With them they brought their French spaniels, herding dogs, and hound dogs. Dogs from France were also traded to the English where they were then crossed to Greyhounds to produce a lighter, racier, and faster hound. From there, the English Foxhounds were born. English Foxhounds were brought to the Thirteen Colonies in their infancy, where they proved to be excellent at hunting foxes and other quarry, such as bears and raccoons.

For centuries, these dogs proliferated throughout the New England Colonies and American South. While most hunters found the speed and excitement of the foxhounds on hot trails, some still appreciated the steadfastness of the larger cold-nosed dogs. However, they never reached the level of popularity of their faster relatives because the faster dogs won more trials.

Lee Newhart Jr. was among those who appreciated the larger dogs. Lee ran a special strain that were selected from dogs that were larger than the typical foxhounds and coonhounds of his time. The ancestry of these dogs included both traditional large coonhounds and dogs descended from the older bloodhound and Gascogne types. Newhart’s dogs were renowned for their cold-trailing abilities, work ethic, and melodic bay. Tired of seeing these dogs lumped in with the lighter and racier dogs, Newhart set out to have his dogs registered as separate from the other coonhounds and foxhounds. And so, the first Majestic Treehound was registered in 1980, with many more to follow.

Many assume that the Majestic is a straight cross between a bloodhound and other foxhound or coonhound, since many bloodhound and other hound crosses are advertised as such. However, the Majestic Treehound is its own closed-breed, bearing several generations of dogs breeding true to the standard.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat dolichocephalic skull type, the skull is long, narrow compared to the length, and in proportion to the rest of the body. From above, the skull appears to taper from the back skull toward the tip of the nose only slightly and almost imperceptibly. It appears nearly equal in width throughout. The occiput is prominent. The head is furnished with somewhat looser skin, but never as excessive as that of a bloodhound. Dogs with loose skin around the eyes or drooping eyelids are to be heavily penalized.
Eyes: The eyes are set well into the skull, are medium in size, and are oval, lozenge, or diamond in shape. The eyelids should be relatively well fitting, never appearing heavy, loose, sunken, with exposed haw, or with any sign of ectropion or entropion. Color should be as dark as possible, but may include hazel, amber, or light brown in liver-color varieties. The eyelids or skin around the eyes should not interfere with the dog’s vision in any capacity. Loose eyes in any capacity have the tendency to capture debris and are not conducive to a working dog’s ability to track.
Ears: The ears are large, hound-type ears that are set low on the skull. Ears that extend no further than the point of the nose are preferred to those that extend well beyond the point of the nose, since longer ears are prone to dragging the ground and retaining dirt and moisture. The ears hang in long, graceful folds, close to the head.
Muzzle: Strongly developed, equal in length to the topskull, and uniformly broad throughout. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance. Upper and lower jaws are strong and well developed, never appearing snipy or weak. The plane of the muzzle may be straight and level, or slightly sloped (slight Roman nose).
Nose: The nose is well pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well opened.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and powerfully muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. Some loose skin on the neck and throat is permissible, but preference should be given to dogs with cleaner necks and tighter fit of skin. Excess throatiness and pendulous dewlaps should not be preferred.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows. It is well filled between the forechest, forming keel of good depth and somewhat of prominence.
Body: Compact, solid, and good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters. Withers and hindquarters are approximately equal in width.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. When alert or in motion, the tail is carried above the level of horizontal. Tail may be left natural (preferred) or docked short. Natural tails are of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved.
Movement: The gait is surprisingly energetic and springy for a large breed. It is efficient, effortless, and agile. A slight roll may be present, but movement should never appear cloddy or encumbered by size in any way, as this is a dog that must be capable of steady and enduring movement for miles and hours. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: Like most hounds, the Majestic Treehound is loyal, devoted, and affectionate. Also, as with most hounds, he does well in multi-dog and multi-people families. He is very skilled with his nose and natural scenting instincts, becoming almost a slave to the world of scent. This aspect of the Majestic has earned his reputation as being super-focused and even stubborn once he has picked up a trail. He is sensitive to his master’s mood and actions, so gentle-but-firm obedience training helps him adjust to life as a pet. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds

Proportions: The Majestic Treehound is an off-square to somewhat rectangular breed, with the length of the body from the point of the chest to the point of the rump, being greater than the height at the withers. The body is well-put together. Substance is sturdy and moderately heavy-boned, yet still athletic in appearance and capabilities. The ideal body-height-to-length ratio is approximately 5:4 to 10:9. The body is well put together, with sturdy substance and medium bone. Males should appear masculine, being more substantial in size and mass, while females should appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type. Overly massive or weedy dogs are incorrect, as are dogs with an exaggerated abundance of skin.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat dolichocephalic skull type, the skull is long, narrow compared to the length, and in proportion to the rest of the body. From above, the skull appears to taper from the back skull toward the tip of the nose only slightly and almost imperceptibly. It appears nearly equal in width throughout. The occiput is prominent. The head is furnished with somewhat looser skin, but never as excessive as that of a bloodhound. Dogs with loose skin around the eyes or drooping eyelids are to be heavily penalized.
Expression: The expression is noble, intelligent, solemn, wise, and powerful.
Stop: The stop is moderate to slightly pronounced.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1, with the topskull being approximately equal to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel or slightly divergent.
Muzzle: Strongly developed, equal in length to the topskull, and uniformly broad throughout. Upper and lower jaws have good bone substance. Upper and lower jaws are strong and well developed, never appearing snipy or weak. The plane of the muzzle may be straight and level, or slightly sloped (slight Roman nose).
Lips or Flews: The lips are somewhat loose, but not pendulous, hanging just at (preferred) or below the lower jaws, and running into light dewlaps. Lips should be sufficient in length to give depth to the muzzle, giving the muzzle a square and deep appearance. Excessively long and pendulous lips and flews should be penalized.
Nose: The nose is well pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat. The nostrils are well opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are smooth, appearing neither chiseled nor coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level or scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors.
Eyes: The eyes are set well into the skull, are medium in size, and are oval, lozenge, or diamond in shape. The eyelids should be relatively well fitting, never appearing heavy, loose, sunken, with exposed haw, or with any sign of ectropion or entropion. Color should be as dark as possible, but may include hazel, amber, or light brown in liver-color varieties. The eyelids or skin around the eyes should not interfere with the dog’s vision in any capacity. Loose eyes in any capacity have the tendency to capture debris and are not conducive to a working dog’s ability to track.
Ears: The ears are large, hound-type ears that are set low on the skull. Ears that extend no further than the point of the nose are preferred to those that extend well beyond the point of the nose, since longer ears are prone to dragging the ground and retaining dirt and moisture. The ears hang in long, graceful folds, close to the head.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, solid, and good substance. The body is never racy or refined. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters. Withers and hindquarters are approximately equal in width.
Neck: Moderate length to allow for proud head carriage and powerfully muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. Some loose skin on the neck and throat is permissible, but preference should be given to dogs with cleaner necks and tighter fit of skin. Excess throatiness and pendulous dewlaps should not be preferred.
Chest: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Topline: Level from slightly prominent withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat and level, or slightly arched, yet supportive. The topline is never long, swayed, or roached.
Croup: Flat and level with the back, or with an almost imperceptible slope.
Underline: Slight tuck-up may be present, or the underline runs parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Tail: Set high on the croup, thick at the base, and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, but never tucked or carried up over the back. When alert or in motion, the tail is carried above the level of horizontal. Tail may be left natural (preferred) or docked short. Natural tails are of a medium length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending to the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbows is approximately half the dog’s height at the withers.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, moderately strong-boned, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are equal in length, strong, sturdy, of moderately strong bone, and well muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round and compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: Short, close, quite harsh, weatherproof outer coat throughout body, very short and soft on the head and ears. Furnishing on underside of tail.
Coat Color or Pattern: Red, fawn (red with black or liver mask), black with tan, liver with tan, grizzle/badger with tan. Tan can range from creeping tan or mantle pattern to a saddle pattern, to clear red/tan with no trace of saddle.
Red (Red Majestic); white (White Majestic); black with tan points (Black and Tan Majestic), black with tan points and white (Tri-color Majestic); black saddle with tan/hound color (Saddleback Majestic) or creeping tan (High Tan Majestic); red ticked (Red Ticked Majestic or Red Spotted Majestic) or blue ticked (Blue Ticked Majestic or Blue Spotted Majestic).

Movement

The gait is surprisingly energetic and springy for a large breed. It is efficient, effortless, and agile. A slight roll may be present, but movement should never appear cloddy or encumbered by size in any way, as this is a dog that must be capable of steady and enduring movement for miles and hours. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

Like most hounds, the Majestic Treehound is loyal, devoted, and affectionate. Also, as with most hounds, he does well in multi-dog and multi-people families. He is very skilled with his nose and natural scenting instincts, becoming almost a slave to the world of scent. This aspect of the Majestic has earned his reputation as being super-focused and even stubborn once he has picked up a trail. He is sensitive to his master’s mood and actions, so gentle-but-firm obedience training helps him adjust to life as a pet. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.