Ibizan Hound.jpg
Breed Group Group 8: Sighthound Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Spain
Weight Males: 45-55 pounds. Females: 40-50 pounds.
Height Males: 23-29 inches. Females: 22-27 inches.
Other Name(s) Ca Elvissencs, Ibizan Podenco, Ibizan WARREN Hound, Podenco Ibicenco
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD
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Ibizan Hound

Breed Group Group 8: Sighthound Breeds
Sub-group :
Origin Country Spain
Weight Males: 45-55 pounds. Females: 40-50 pounds.
Height Males: 23-29 inches. Females: 22-27 inches.
Other Name(s) Ca Elvissencs, Ibizan Podenco, Ibizan WARREN Hound, Podenco Ibicenco
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

The Ibizan Hound is an ancient hunting breed descended from the ancestors of the Pharaoh Hounds. Ancestors of the Ibizan have been depicted in ancient tombs and artifacts from thousands of years ago. These dogs accompanied merchants on ancient trade routes throughout the Mediterranean, where they found their way to Ibiza.

Although the breed appears to conform to the stereotypical build of a sighthound, the Ibizan is unique in that it does not hunt by sight alone. Instead, Ibizan Hounds utilize all of their senses, first scanning the environment using their scenting ability to detect the presence of prey, and then uses their sense of sound to orient the location. Once detected and oriented, they will give way to an elaborate chase sequence, in which the entire pack, if present, will wait for their individual part. Originally used to hunt hares and rabbits, these dogs have been employed hunting companions on the Ibiza islands for over 5,000 years.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Fairly dolichocephalic skull-type, moderate in size, long, fine, and shaped like an elongated cone with a blunt end. The skull is long and flat, with a somewhat marked occiput and smooth, flat, and fine forehead. It appears somewhat smaller in proportion to the rest of the racy body. The head is clean-cut and without excess skin or wrinkle, and completely dry.
Eyes: Somewhat small to moderate in size, almond in shape, and yellow to amber in color. They eyes are obliquely set. The eye rims are well fitted and well pigmented. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: Medium in size. Set somewhat high, yet wide on the skull, with the center of the base of the ears being in line with the eyes. They are less triangular, but more shaped like a large rhomboid that has had 1/3 of its longer diagonal portion removed. The ears are firmly erect, yet highly mobile. They may tilt forward when alert, be dropped sideways, or be pulled back. They lack hair on the inner portions. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, yet fine and elongated. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight and level, or just slightly convex. It tapers slightly from the slightly broader base toward the nose. Upper and lower jaws are well developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Nose: The nose is well pigmented and self-colored according to the coat in shades from pink to liver. The nostrils are well opened. The nose protrudes slightly beyond the vertical line of the end of the muzzle, giving the muzzle a somewhat pointed appearance.
Neck: Moderately long length, approximately ¼ of the length of the body. Slightly arched, muscular, and clean. The neck tapers slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head.
Chest: Very deep and narrow, with the brisket extending to the approximate point of the elbows, or just before the point of the elbows. The forechest is strongly developed.
Body: Compact, somewhat convex, symmetrical, powerful, and lithe, never appearing weak and slack, but never heavy or cumbersome. Always of sufficient substance to allow speed, dexterity, and strength. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval, with well-arched toes and tough pads. Toes are well webbed for swimming.
Tail: Set somewhat low on the croup. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually hanging in a neutral position in repose, but never tucked tight against the stomach. The tail is long, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the hock joints when held down and reaching the spine when pulled through the legs and brought to the back. The tail may be straight or gently curved.
Movement: Smooth, flowing gait with graceful movements that are energetic, effortless, and efficient. They move in a suspended trot, as well as an impressive ground-covering gallop. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Ibizan Hound will typically appear regal, but come off as aloof to indifferent to those who do not know him personally. However, to his family he is affectionate, loyal, and clownish. True hunting dogs at heart, they will chase anything that they deem worthy prey, including a cat or squirrel that they may see across a busy road. For this reason, they should not be let loose in open areas that are unsecured by a very high (eight feet or more) fence, as they are known to easily clear a six-foot fence. Packs of hunting dogs typically consist of just females or mostly females, as the males tend to develop aggressive tendencies towards other males. Also, heavy socialization and training are necessary, especially towards cats and other small animals that the dog will need to tolerate later as an adult. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 8: Sighthound Breeds

Proportions: Sleek, racy, and somewhat rectangular, being slightly longer than high, but never appearing stout by any means with length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump, being slightly greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body height to length ratio is 12:11. Females may be slightly longer. The body is lithe, yet strong, never appearing to lack strength or power, but never appearing heavy or bulky. The bone is moderately fine throughout, yet sturdy. Males appear masculine, being slightly more substantial, while females appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type.

Head

General Appearance: Fairly dolichocephalic skull-type, moderate in size, long, fine, and shaped like an elongated cone with a blunt end. The skull is long and flat, with a somewhat marked occiput and smooth, flat, and fine forehead. It appears somewhat smaller in proportion to the rest of the racy body. The head is clean-cut and without excess skin or wrinkle, and completely dry.
Expression: Aristocratic, watchful, and intelligent, yet reserved.
Stop: The stop is slight, being barely pronounced.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1 with the topskull being equal to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full, yet fine and elongated. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight and level, or just slightly convex. It tapers slightly from the slightly broader base toward the nose. Upper and lower jaws are well developed, approximately equal in length, and have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Lips or Flews: Lips are clean and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws.
Nose: The nose is well pigmented and self-colored according to the coat in shades from pink to liver. The nostrils are well opened. The nose protrudes slightly beyond the vertical line of the end of the muzzle, giving the muzzle a somewhat pointed appearance.
Cheeks: The cheeks are smoothly muscled and flat. The cheeks should not appear chiseled or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level or scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: Somewhat small to moderate in size, almond in shape, and yellow to amber in color. They eyes are obliquely set. The eye rims are well fitted and well pigmented. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes. Any signs of entropion or ectropion are incorrect for this breed.
Ears: Medium in size. Set somewhat high, yet wide on the skull, with the center of the base of the ears being in line with the eyes. They are less triangular, but more shaped like a large rhomboid that has had 1/3 of its longer diagonal portion removed. The ears are firmly erect, yet highly mobile. They may tilt forward when alert, be dropped sideways, or be pulled back. They lack hair on the inner portions. The ears are never long, overly large, or broken.

Body and Tail

General Description: Compact, somewhat convex, symmetrical, powerful, and lithe, never appearing weak and slack, but never heavy or cumbersome. Always of sufficient substance to allow speed, dexterity, and strength. Width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderately long length, approximately ¼ of the length of the body. Slightly arched, muscular, and clean. The neck tapers slightly from the deeper and broader body toward the head.
Chest: Very deep and narrow, with the brisket extending to the approximate point of the elbows, or just before the point of the elbows. The forechest is strongly developed.
Topline: Straight and level from high, well-defined withers to croup. The back is long, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, strong, supple, and arched, yet supportive. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Broad, tightly muscled with tight, sinewy, yet somewhat flat muscle, prominent hip bones, gently sloped.
Underline: Moderately tucked up. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set somewhat low on the croup. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, usually hanging in a neutral position in repose, but never tucked tight against the stomach. The tail is long, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the hock joints when held down and reaching the spine when pulled through the legs and brought to the back. The tail may be straight or gently curved.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are very long and approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbows is approximately half the dog’s height at the withers. The distance from the withers to the brisket may be equal to, or just greater than, the distance from the elbows to the ground.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, of moderately fine yet sturdy bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are very long, equal in length, strong, of moderately refined yet sturdy bone, and well muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval, with well-arched toes and tough pads. Toes are well webbed for swimming.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The Ibizan Hound comes in two coat varieties: the smooth coat and the rough coat.
Smooth coat variety: The coat is short, smooth, and close to the body throughout. The texture is harsh and glossy. The coat may be slightly longer on the neck, forming a very light ruff, and on the tail, the hairs are slightly off-standing, similar to wheat grains on the stem.
Rough Coat Variety: The coat is harsh, rough, wiry, and hard throughout. The head may exhibit a light mustache, beard, and eyebrows.
Coat Color or Pattern: Solid white or solid red to solid chestnut, red or chestnut with varying degrees of white markings, or white with varying degrees of red or chestnut markings. Fawn, fawn with white, or white with fawn is found in the rough coated variety

Movement

Smooth, flowing gait with graceful movements that are energetic, effortless, and efficient. They move in a suspended trot, as well as an impressive ground-covering gallop. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Ibizan Hound will typically appear regal, but come off as aloof to indifferent to those who do not know him personally. However, to his family he is affectionate, loyal, and clownish. True hunting dogs at heart, they will chase anything that they deem worthy prey, including a cat or squirrel that they may see across a busy road. For this reason, they should not be let loose in open areas that are unsecured by a very high (eight feet or more) fence, as they are known to easily clear a six-foot fence. Packs of hunting dogs typically consist of just females or mostly females, as the males tend to develop aggressive tendencies towards other males. Also, heavy socialization and training are necessary, especially towards cats and other small animals that the dog will need to tolerate later as an adult. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.