Welsh Corgi-Cardigan.jpg
Breed Group Group 10: Pastoral and Stock Dog Breeds
Sub-group 10-D: Small Pastoral Dogs
Origin Country Wales
Weight Males: 30-38 pounds. Females: 25-34 pounds.
Height Males: 10-13 inches. Females: 10-13 inches.
Other Name(s) Cardi, Cardiagan Corgi, Cardigan, Cardigan Corgi, Welsh Cardigan, Welsh Cardigan Corgi
Breed Type Pure
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Welsh Corgi-Cardigan

Breed Group Group 10: Pastoral and Stock Dog Breeds
Sub-group 10-D: Small Pastoral Dogs
Origin Country Wales
Weight Males: 30-38 pounds. Females: 25-34 pounds.
Height Males: 10-13 inches. Females: 10-13 inches.
Other Name(s) Cardi, Cardiagan Corgi, Cardigan, Cardigan Corgi, Welsh Cardigan, Welsh Cardigan Corgi
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Pembroke Welsh Corgi both share the same obscure origin. Some breed historians believe that Corgis came from Nordic and Spitz types, but others claim that Corgis are descendants of the Teckel (dachshund) family. It has also been said that each of the two Welsh Corgi breeds come from completely different lineages. Other, more colorful accounts claim that the Corgis were a gift bestowed upon humanity by fairies. Ultimately, what is known about these little dogs is that they have been utilized in the fields for over 3,000 years, well before dogs were divided into breeds.

A more realistic scenario is that the Welsh Corgi’s ancestors included a number of ancient dogs, such as the similarly appearing Swedish Vallhund. It is believed that these dogs were brought to Wales by ancient Viking and Flemish wayfarers from abroad in the early 1100s. These little dogs were used to accompany and protect flocks and herds of sheep, geese, and cattle. For this reason, it is believed that Corgis are among the oldest dog breeds in the United Kingdom. The etymology of the word “Corgi” is not known with 100-percent certainty, but some argue that the name was derived from the Welsh words, cor, meaning dwarf, and gi, meaning dog. Others claim that the name is from the word cur, meaning to watch over, and gi meaning dog, essentially translating to watchdog.

The variety known as the Cardigan is believed to be the original Welsh Corgi, with the Pembroke Corgi being more recently refined. The namesakes of the two varieties are indicative of where the dogs were thought to have been most commonly associated or developed: the Cardigan from Cardiganshire, and the Pembroke from Pembrokeshire. However, it was only recently that a distinction between the two types was made. In fact, it wasn’t until the 1920s that breeding and organizing efforts began to enhance the Corgi’s looks, which also accounts for the recently divergent types. Evidence exists of the dogs being crossbred, perhaps for thousands of years, leading up to the separation of the varieties. Many of the differences in appearance were the result of recent enhancements that separated the dogs into two separate types and eventually separate breeds.

Corgis weren’t always used for herding. In fact, many believe that the first job of a Corgi was to accompany the flocks and herds out to pasture or the market. Eventually, the dogs were used to drive the herds by barking at them from the rear. Once commoners in Wales were allowed to farm their own land, the need for dogs to drive herds for long distances became a thing of the past, and the Corgis found themselves serving as companions and dwindling in number.

The first Corgis to make their way to the show ring in 1925 were simply exhibited as Welsh Corgis, lacking any distinction between the breed types. In that same year, the Corgi Club was founded. However, a difference of type preferences caused a divide within the club. One group preferred the smaller, bobtailed Pembroke type, so fanciers of the Cardigan types started their own club. Each group worked on standardizing and further developing their own favorite type until the two varieties developed some distinction. However, it wasn’t until 1928 that the two types were distinct enough to be officially recognized as separate varieties of the same breed, and it wasn’t until 1934 that they were finally separated into two breeds by the recognizing kennel clubs.

The first Welsh Corgis were imported to the United States. From there, the breed became an iconic symbol of royalty. Both varieties of the Corgi are bold, friendly, and easily adapt to any situation they find themselves in. They are excellent herders, nipping at the heels of their charges to get them to move on over with the herd. The fact that they’re low to the ground works in their favor, since their compact build allows them to get out of the way of cattle hooves. They are exceptionally smart and alert little dogs that need a job to keep them busy. Whether they are out herding, catching vermin, guarding the house, or playing with toys or the children of the family, Corgis greatly enjoy their busy lives.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Mesaticephalic skull type, moderate in size, wedge-shaped, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is proportionate to the body and foxlike in appearance when viewed from above or in profile. The topskull is long, broad, and flat between the ears from the front, or when viewed in profile. It tapers from the broader topskull toward the narrower muzzle. A slight depression may be visible at the stop. The head is fairly chiseled without appearing weak or fine, but only slightly refined. It is clean-cut and without excess skin or wrinkle.
Eyes: The eyes are moderately sized, in proportion to the face, and may be opened oval to almond in shape, never round. The rims are darkly pigmented and tightly fitting. The color may range from blue to medium or dark brown. Bicolored, flecked, or marbled eyes are permissible on merle (including hidden or cryptic merle) dogs. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect
the eyes.
Ears: The ears are moderately large in size, broad at the base, firmly erect, and set somewhat wide apart. The tips of the ears, which are characteristically rounded, should orient at approximately the 11 o’clock and 1 o’clock position. Ears should never appear broken, drop, small, pointed, pointed straight up (too upright), or low. Ears are held in repose when moving or not alerted. Correct ears can be determined if lines drawn from the nose tip up through the eyes fall within or around the ear tips, forming the shape of a “V” or an equilateral triangle.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full and broad. It tapers from a rather broad base to a rounded muzzle end. The end of the muzzle is never blunt or pointed. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in non-standard color varieties. The nostrils are well-opened. The nose may project slightly forward in comparison to the end of the muzzle.
Neck: Moderately long length allows for proud head carriage. It is powerfully muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows or just slightly below. The forechest is well-developed.
Body: Solid, of good substance, and long in comparison to the length of the forelimbs and hind limbs. The body is never light and weedy, nor is it heavy. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.
Tail: Set low on the croup. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, carried at back level or lower when neutral, but never tucked. The tail is of a moderately long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the point of the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved, forming a brush or a slight saber.
Movement: Merry, energetic, effortless, efficient, and agile, the characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Cardigan Welsh Corgi’s temperament is playful, affectionate, and steady. He is ranked high in intelligence and makes an excellent working dog or companion. Cardigan Welsh Corgis are great watchdogs and will alert their families to anything that may be amiss. Notoriously gentle as they mature, they make great playmates for other dogs and children, especially when socialized early on. They also excel in many areas of discipline and events such as agility, obedience, tracking, and article search, and some are still used for herding today. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 10: Pastoral and Stock Dog Breeds

Proportions: The body type is rectangular, with body length (measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump) being greater than the height at the withers. The ideal body-length-to-height ratio should equal 2:1, with the brisket having good clearance from the ground. The ideal height-to-brisket ratio is 3:1. The body is well muscled and somewhat substantial, strong, elongated in comparison to the limb length, and well put together. Substance is sturdy with moderately solid bone that appears heavier due to the shortened limb length. This is a breed capable of great endurance and a surprising amount of agility for its stature. It should never appear square, leggy, light, or cobby. Males should appear masculine, being more substantial in size and mass, while females should appear more feminine and slightly less substantial. Neither should lack overall type.

Head

General Appearance: Mesaticephalic skull type, moderate in size, wedge-shaped, and in proportion to the rest of the body. The head is proportionate to the body and foxlike in appearance when viewed from above or in profile. The topskull is long, broad, and flat between the ears from the front, or when viewed in profile. It tapers from the broader topskull toward the narrower muzzle. A slight depression may be visible at the stop. The head is fairly chiseled without appearing weak or fine, but only slightly refined. It is clean-cut and without excess skin or wrinkle.
Expression: The expression is gentle, watchful, doting, lively, alert, engaged, and friendly.
Stop: The stop is moderate yet definite.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 5:3, with the topskull being somewhat longer than the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis is parallel.
Muzzle: The muzzle is full and broad. It tapers from a rather broad base to a rounded muzzle end. The end of the muzzle is never blunt or pointed. The plane, or bridge of the muzzle, is straight. Upper and lower jaws are well-developed, approximately equal in length, have good bone substance, never appearing snipy or weak.
Lips or Flews: Lips are clean and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in non-standard color varieties. The nostrils are well-opened. The nose may project slightly forward in comparison to the end of the muzzle.
Cheeks: The cheeks are smoothly muscled, never chiseled or coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level, scissor, or reverse-scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to
be penalized.
Eyes: The eyes are moderately sized, in proportion to the face, and may be opened oval to almond in shape, never round. The rims are darkly pigmented and tightly fitting. The color may range from blue to medium or dark brown. Bicolored, flecked, or marbled eyes are permissible on merle (including hidden or cryptic merle) dogs. The eyes are never bulging. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect
the eyes.
Ears: The ears are moderately large in size, broad at the base, firmly erect, and set somewhat wide apart. The tips of the ears, which are characteristically rounded, should orient at approximately the 11 o’clock and 1 o’clock position. Ears should never appear broken, drop, small, pointed, pointed straight up (too upright), or low. Ears are held in repose when moving or not alerted. Correct ears can be determined if lines drawn from the nose tip up through the eyes fall within or around the ear tips, forming the shape of a “V” or an equilateral triangle.

Body and Tail

General Description: Solid, of good substance, and long in comparison to the length of the forelimbs and hind limbs. The body is never light and weedy, nor is it heavy. Width at the forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Moderately long length allows for proud head carriage. It is powerfully muscled with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut and without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep and broad, but never wider than deep. The brisket extends to the point of the elbows or just slightly below. The forechest is well-developed.
Topline: Level from slightly prominent withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat and level, or slightly arched, yet supportive. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Gently sloped.
Underline: Slight tuck-up present, or the underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, and oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set low on the croup. It is thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. The tail is carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, carried at back level or lower when neutral, but never tucked. The tail is of a moderately long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the point of the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight or gently curved, forming a brush or a slight saber.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are long, being somewhat greater in length than the dwarfed upper arm and forearm bones.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The distance from the withers to the brisket is greater than the distance from the elbows to the ground by approximately ½.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, of moderate bone, and parallel to one another.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak or broken.
Hindquarters: Upper thigh and lower thigh are rather short, or dwarfed, but equal in length. They are strong, sturdy, of moderate bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns.
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The Cardigan Welsh Corgi comes in two coat varieties: the standard coat and the fluffy coat.
Standard-coat variety: Close, shorter to medium length, dense, slightly harsh, weather-resistant outer coat with slight ruff and fringing on underside, and back of legs and thighs. Undercoat is short, soft, and thick.
Fluffy-coat variety: The coat is short on the face, forehead, and front of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. The coat is longer and fluffier, or longer and flat on the neck, ears, rear of the front and hindlimbs, feet, and tail, forming well-developed fringe and furnishings. Undercoat is soft and dense.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Cardigan Welsh Corgi breed: the standard color and nonstandard color.
Standard coat color variety: All shades of tan or red, sables, and brindles. Black with or without tan or brindle points, creeping tan or brindle, or running tan or brindle, all with or without blue merle pattern. All with or without white markings, so long as white does not predominate. Preferably without white around the eyes. Large patches or amounts of white indicating homogenous merle genotype/phenotype is undesirable.
Nonstandard coat color variety: Any color other than that specified above, mismarked dogs, predominantly white dogs.

Movement

Merry, energetic, effortless, efficient, and agile, the characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs should remain parallel, with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the centerline of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi’s temperament is playful, affectionate, and steady. He is ranked high in intelligence and makes an excellent working dog or companion. Cardigan Welsh Corgis are great watchdogs and will alert their families to anything that may be amiss. Notoriously gentle as they mature, they make great playmates for other dogs and children, especially when socialized early on. They also excel in many areas of discipline and events such as agility, obedience, tracking, and article search, and some are still used for herding today. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.