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Breed Group Group 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds
Sub-group 7-C: Short-legged Hounds and Dachshunds
Origin Country Germany
Weight Males: 0-11 pounds. Females: 0-11 pounds.
Height Males: 0-14 inches. Females: 0-14 inches.
Other Name(s) Kaninchen (Rabit), Normalgrosse (Standard), Normalschlag (Standard), Zwergteckel (Miniature), Zwert (Miniature)
Breed Type Pure
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Dachshund-Miniature

Breed Group Group 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds
Sub-group 7-C: Short-legged Hounds and Dachshunds
Origin Country Germany
Weight Males: 0-11 pounds. Females: 0-11 pounds.
Height Males: 0-14 inches. Females: 0-14 inches.
Other Name(s) Kaninchen (Rabit), Normalgrosse (Standard), Normalschlag (Standard), Zwergteckel (Miniature), Zwert (Miniature)
Breed Type Pure
click here for FULL BREED STANDARD

Origins

The Dachshund’s origins can be traced back to Germany’s Middle Ages. During this time, personal firearms were not widely available to peasants and hunters, but dogs were. Therefore, German hunters relied heavily on dogs for their ability to provide for their families. Badgers, once a popular quarry in Germany, were prized for their pelts, meat, and fat. Badger hunting in itself presented hunters with a number of challenges, including the fact that badgers are nocturnal, sleep in extensive underground dens, and are notoriously aggressive when defending themselves. The Schweisshunds, or “trailinghounds,” could trail the badger, but were too large and leggy to follow it to ground. Terriers were excellent at going to ground and dispatching the badgers, but would do so at the expense of a greatly damaged pelt. This particular game required a dog that had scenting ability to track the animal down, was small enough to follow it to ground, courageous enough to confront it, and powerful enough to dispatch it and extract it, but not so “gamey” that it would mutilate the pelt. Thus, the smaller, shorter-legged varieties of the Schweisshunds became prized for their badger-hunting capabilities and were eventually dubbed “Dachshund,” which translates to “Badger Hound” in German.

Eventually, the larger standard sizes were bred down to specialize in rabbit hunting. In fact, some countries are home to an especially small variety known as the “Kaninchen,” or Rabbit Dachshund. This type has the smallest chest circumference of all.

The Dachshund is the only breed in which varieties are determined by chest circumference. In some organizations, such as Continental Kennel Club (CKC), Dachshunds are literally in a class (or breed group) of their own, due to their dual purpose of scenting and going to ground.

Breed Characteristics

Head: Somewhat dolichocephalic in skull-type, moderate in size, elongated, elegant, and in proportion to the rest of the body. When viewed from above or in profile, the head is elongated, elegant, tapering toward the nose. In profile, the skull may appear flat to slightly arched, gradually merging into a strong, well-developed, straight or slightly arched nasal bridge and muzzle. The superciliary arches are well-defined. The head is clean-cut, without excess skin or wrinkle.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and may or may not be set just slightly oblique. They are medium to dark brown (preferred) in standard, black-based colored dogs. Color may range from hazel green, blue-gray, to amber in dilute varieties. Dapple dogs may have blue, partially blue, or marble eyes. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. The eyes are never bulging, large, or round. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are large, animated, moderately long, and rounded at the tips. When animated, they will appear set high on the skull, nearly level with the topline of the skull, with the tips hanging close to the cheeks. The ears should never appear pendulous, like those of a Basset Hound, nor “fly-way.”
Muzzle: The muzzle is well-developed, elongated, and powerful. Although long, it is also full, deep, and broad. The muzzle should never be weak, snipy, or blocky (with loose flews). The plane of the muzzle may be level and straight, or slightly arched, giving a roman appearance. The upper and lower jaws are equal in length with good substance. They are well-developed, giving depth and strength to the muzzle.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in non-standard color varieties. The nostrils are well-opened.
Neck: Sufficiently long to allow for proud head carriage, strongly-muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep, broad, but never wider than deep. The sternum is well-developed, yet not overly pronounced. The brisket lies below the elbow with the point of the elbow to the brisket equaling one third of the entire depth of the body (measured from the withers to the brisket). The distance from the brisket to the ground should equal 1/3 of the dog’s height at the withers.
Body: Appearing somewhat long in comparison to the height. It is compact, solid, and of good substance. The width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads. Forefeet may orient forward, or turn just slightly outward.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, either above or below the level of the topline, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tail is of a long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, gently curved, or slightly curled toward the tip. Ring tails, kink tails, or tucked tails are incorrect.
Movement: The Dachshund’s movement is quick, agile, and energetic. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs may remain parallel with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out, or the forelegs may slightly converge under the dog’s body. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.
Temperament: The Dachshund is an affable, friendly, and even-tempered dog. Once-valued hunting instincts, which include scenting, digging, and dispatch of smaller animals, can be quite strong in this breed. They are affectionate, loyal, and jubilant characters. Dachshunds should never appear timid or shy. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.
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Breed Standard

BREED GROUP 7: Scenthounds and Related Breeds

Proportions: A rectangular breed, with the length of the body, measured from the point of the forechest to the point of the rump, being greater than the height at the withers. The height at the withers is approximately half the length of the body (measured from the point of the sternum to the point of the rump). There should be sufficient distance from the brisket to the ground (at least 1/3 the total distance from the withers to the ground) to allow for ground clearance. Substance is sturdy and of solid bone.

Head

General Appearance: Somewhat dolichocephalic in skull-type, moderate in size, elongated, elegant, and in proportion to the rest of the body. When viewed from above or in profile, the head is elongated, elegant, tapering toward the nose. In profile, the skull may appear flat to slightly arched, gradually merging into a strong, well-developed, straight or slightly arched nasal bridge and muzzle. The superciliary arches are well-defined. The head is clean-cut, without excess skin or wrinkle.
Expression: Confident, regal, energetic, intelligent, alert, and friendly, yet sometimes mischievous.
Stop: The stop is very slight and almost imperceptible.
Skull: The ideal muzzle-to-skull ratio is 1:1, with the topskull being equal in length to the muzzle.
The ideal muzzle-to-skull axis may range from parallel, convergent, or divergent.
Muzzle: The muzzle is well-developed, elongated, and powerful. Although long, it is also full, deep, and broad. The muzzle should never be weak, snipy, or blocky (with loose flews). The plane of the muzzle may be level and straight, or slightly arched, giving a roman appearance. The upper and lower jaws are equal in length with good substance. They are well-developed, giving depth and strength to the muzzle.
Lips or Flews: Lips are clean and fit tightly over the teeth and jaws, revealing the elegant taper of the muzzle.
Nose: The nose is well-pigmented and black, or self-colored according to the coat in non-standard color varieties. The nostrils are well-opened.
Cheeks: The cheeks are well-padded, but should never appear coarse.
Dentition and Bite: Forty-two strong, clean, white teeth. Bite may be level or scissor. Contact must be made between the top and bottom incisors. Missing or broken teeth as a result of routine work is not to be penalized.
Eyes: Moderate in size, oval to almond in shape, and may or may not be set just slightly oblique. They are medium to dark brown (preferred) in standard, black-based colored dogs. Color may range from hazel green, blue-gray, to amber in dilute varieties. Dapple dogs may have blue, partially blue, or marble eyes. The eye rims are well-fitted and well-pigmented. The eyes are never bulging, large, or round. There should be sufficient bone in the surrounding orbital sockets to protect the eyes.
Ears: The ears are large, animated, moderately long, and rounded at the tips. When animated, they will appear set high on the skull, nearly level with the topline of the skull, with the tips hanging close to the cheeks. The ears should never appear pendulous, like those of a Basset Hound, nor “fly-way.”

Body and Tail

General Description: Appearing somewhat long in comparison to the height. It is compact, solid, and of good substance. The width at forequarters is approximately equal to the width at the hindquarters.
Neck: Sufficiently long to allow for proud head carriage, strongly-muscled, with a slight arch. The neck tapers smoothly from the deeper and broader body toward the head. The neck is clean-cut, without excess skin, throatiness, or dewlap.
Chest: Deep, broad, but never wider than deep. The sternum is well-developed, yet not overly pronounced. The brisket lies below the elbow with the point of the elbow to the brisket equaling one third of the entire depth of the body (measured from the withers to the brisket). The distance from the brisket to the ground should equal 1/3 of the dog’s height at the withers.
Topline: Withers may be slightly prominent. The topline may be level or gently sloped from withers to croup. The back is broad, strongly muscled, and straight, yet supple. The loin is taut, flat, and level. The back is never swayed or roached.
Croup: Broad, long, and gently sloped.
Underline: A slight tuck up may be present, or the underline may run parallel to the topline. The underline is taut and firm, without any indication of sagging or excess weight.
Ribs: Long, well-sprung, well-laid-back, oval-shaped, never barrel-chested or slab-sided.
Tail: Set neither high nor low on the croup, thick at the base and tapering toward the tip. Carried in accordance with the dog’s mood and energy level, either above or below the level of the topline, but never tucked or carried up over the back. Tail is of a long length, with the tip of the last vertebrae extending beyond the hock joints when held down. The tail may be straight, gently curved, or slightly curled toward the tip. Ring tails, kink tails, or tucked tails are incorrect.

Forequarters and Hindquarters

Forequarters: Forequarters are always in balance with the hindquarters. Forequarters are well-angulated with well-laid-back shoulder blades. Shoulder blades are approximately equal in length to the upper arm and forearm, which is dwarfed. The growth of the long bones (scapula, upper and lower arm bones) are achondroplastic, or stunted, resulting in the breed’s characteristic shortened limbs that in turn, results in the body appearing elongated.
Elbows: Elbows are close to the body. The point of the elbow lies between 1/3 to 1/4 the distance of the withers to the brisket.
Forelegs: Frontal View: Straight, of good muscle, solid bone, and parallel to one another, or may be set somewhat under the dog in individuals with a traditional “wrap-around” front.
Side View: The forelimbs appear straight with strong pasterns.
Pasterns: Never weak, broken, or knuckled over.
Hindquarters: The growth of the long bones (upper thigh, lower thigh, and rear pastern) is achondroplastic, or stunted, resulting in the breed’s characteristic shortened limbs that, in turn, results in the body appearing elongated.
The pelvis, upper thigh, lower thigh, and rear pastern are all short and equal in length. The hindquarters are strong, sturdy, of solid bone, and well-muscled.
Rear View: When viewed from the rear, the rear pasterns are parallel to one another.
Side View: Good angulation will allow the rear toes to align with the point of the rump or within one to two paw-lengths behind the point of the rump, with the rear pasterns remaining perpendicular to the ground and parallel to one another.
Stifle Joint: Well-angulated with a good bend to well-let-down rear pasterns. Front feet may orient straight
Angulations: Angulation of hindquarters is always in balance with angulation of forequarters.
Feet: Oval to round, compact, with well-arched toes and tough pads. Forefeet may orient forward, or turn just slightly outward.

Coat

Skin: Well-fitted, yet supple. The skin should never obstruct the outline of the dog.
Coat Type: The Dachshund comes in three coat varieties; the Longhaired Dachshund, the Smooth Dachshund, and the Wirehaired Dachshund.
Smooth Dachshund: The coat is short, dense, smooth, and close to the body throughout. The texture is soft, glossy, with or without undercoat. If undercoat is present, coat will be slightly longer on neck, forming a light ruff, and on the tail. No fringe or feather permissible.
Longhaired Dachshund: The coat is short on the face, forehead, and front of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. The coat is longer on the neck, ears, rear of the front and hindlimbs, feet, and tail, forming well-developed fringe and furnishings. Coat may be straight or with slight wave. Undercoats may or may not be present. The coat should never be abundantly thick, abundantly long, or silky.
Wirehaired Dachshund: With the exception of the ears, the entire body is covered with a dense, uniform, short, thick, rough, hard outer coat and a softer, finer undercoat. The coat on the ears retains a softer, nearly smooth texture. The Wirehaired is traditionally exhibited with characteristic facial furnishings, including eyebrows, a beard, and a moustache.
Coat Color or Pattern: CKC recognizes two color varieties of the Dachshund breed; the standard color and nonstandard color variety; large patches or amounts of white indicating homogenous merle genotype/phenotype are undesirable.

Standard coat color variety:
All standard colors with or without a minimal amount of white hairs on the chest or toes.
Solid colors: Cream, yellow, tan, red, red-brown, or mahogany.
Multi-Colors: Black, liver, Isabella (referred to as fawn), or wild boar (agouti), all with distinct and well-defined rich gold, tan, red, or brindled points (called brand) in specific areas restricted to pips above the eyes, rosettes on the cheeks, and the tan or red coloration located on the side of the muzzle, underjaw, chin, sometimes the throat, two triangular patches on the front breast, on the inside of the lower appendages, extending up the inside of the forelimbs and hindlimbs to the first joint, around the tail vent, extending up the tail about 1/3 of the way.
Sable: Sable appears as a dark overlay of the coat caused by hairs with darker tips. The shading can be very light and almost imperceptible, such as clear sable in which the dogs appear almost uniformly cream, tan, red, or mahogany, with the hair tips only sparsely tipped a slightly darker shade of those same colors. Tipped sables include black, liver, blue, silver, or Isabella-tipped hairs are restricted to the ears, and sometimes the back of the head or tail. Some may have masks. Shaded sables appear as tan or red dogs with darker black, liver, blue, or Isabella hairs shading the head, ears, and back. It looks very similar to the creeping tan pattern. The shading can vary from light to dark. Many heavily shaded dogs also have a widow’s peak.
Agouti (Badger / Wild Boar): appears similar to sable, except that the hairs are banded instead of sabeled. Also, the agouti pattern follows the tan-point pattern, rather than the creeping-tan pattern, which includes a bar of color along the muzzle, as opposed to the widow’s peak. The intensity of the agouti color may range from a cream with seemingly darker shading on the head and body, to a completely, darkly badgered dog, appearing similar to the black and tan.
Brindle: The base color is tan or red with alternating streaks of black, liver, Isabella, gray, or blue.
Dapple: Dappled dogs are most often seen as black and tan dogs with the merle gene diluting the black to patches of blue, gray, or silver. However, liver and tans, sables, agoutis, and brindles can also be dappled (merle).
Non-standard coat color variety:
Solid colors of black, liver, blue, gray, or Isabella without tan points (brand). Any of the above-listed standard colors or non-standard colors with varying degrees of white (bicolor, tricolor, piebald, etc.)

Movement

The Dachshund’s movement is quick, agile, and energetic. The characteristics of healthy structure are evident: when moving away, the forelegs and rear pasterns should remain parallel to one another. When viewing movement from the front, the forelegs may remain parallel with elbows and paws moving neither in nor out, or the forelegs may slightly converge under the dog’s body. From the rear, the back pads should be visible when the rear legs are extended. As speed increases, the forelimbs and hindlimbs will converge to the center line of gravity. From the side, the topline should remain firm and level. Good reach of movement in the front allows the forepaw to extend out in a line with the nose. The width between the forefeet when extended should be approximately equal to the width between the hindfeet when extended, indicating balance, good reach, and good drive. Dogs that exhibit any sign of breathing or locomotive difficulty shall be disqualified from the show ring.

Temperament

The Dachshund is an affable, friendly, and even-tempered dog. Once-valued hunting instincts, which include scenting, digging, and dispatch of smaller animals, can be quite strong in this breed. They are affectionate, loyal, and jubilant characters. Dachshunds should never appear timid or shy. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed. Any unprovoked aggressive or fearful behavior toward people is incorrect for this breed.

Faults

All dogs should be in proper healthy condition, free from disease or defect. Any departure from this description is considered a fault. Unless altered, all male dogs should have two fully descended testicles.